The Born Experience

Our great state has birthed some memorable figures—and some we wish to forget, too.

by Lynn Ashby


WHAT DO SAM DONALDSON, NOLAN RYAN AND DWIGHT EISENHOWER HAVE IN COMMON? No, they were not brief members of the Trump cabinet. They were all born in Texas. So were Debbie Reynolds (El Paso), Joan Crawford (San Antonio) and Tommy Lee Jones (San Saba).

Actually, the entertainment industry is filled with our former neighbors: Carol Burnett (San Antonio), Gary Busey (Goose Creek), Cyd Charisse (born Tula Ellice Finklea in Amarillo), Spanky McFarland (Fort Worth), Steve Martin (Waco). And what would the musical world be without Texans? Willie Nelson (Abbott), Trini Lopez (Dallas), Selena (Lake Jackson). And although Larry Hagman (Fort Worth) didn’t sing, his mother Mary Martin (Weatherford), did. Who can forget our favorite singing Longhorn, Janis Joplin (Port Arthur) or the Big Bopper, aka Jiles Perry “J. P.” Richardson, Jr. (Sabine Pass). We also have Beyonce (Houston), Ernest Tubb (Crisp) and Tommy Tune (Wichita Falls). Ragtime composer Scott Joplin (Texarkana) was reintroduced to millions in The Sting. 

Speaking of films, Humphrey Bogart never did say, “Play it again, Sam” in the 1942 film Casablanca. The line, “Play it once, Sam,” was from Ingrid Bergman. Sam was played by Dooley Wilson, who was born in Tyler. Notice that you never see Sam’s fingers on the keyboard. That’s because he was a drummer.

The military has more than its quota of Texans. While Admiral Chester Nimitz (Fredericksburg) commanded the Pacific Fleet in World War II, General Dwight Eisenhower (Dennison) commanded all Allied troops in the European and African Theater.

An interesting story about Ike. He thought he was born in Abilene, Kansas, where he grew up, and put down Abilene as his birthplace on his application to West Point. When Ike became a famous five-star general, a lady in Dennison thought she remembered babysitting little Ike at the Eisenhower home there. (I’ve visited the house, a tiny, humble place.) Ike was surprised to learn he was a native Texan. 


The most decorated soldier in World War II was Audie Murphy (Kingston). He could also be listed in the Hollywood category because, after the war, he made more than 40 movies and a TV series. This military thing is traditional, according to the Western Monthly Magazine in October, 1838: “…the Texians being entirely a military people, not only fought, but drank, in platoons.”

Nobel laureate John Steinbeck, in Travels With Charley observed: “Among other tendencies to be noted, Texas is a military nation. The armed forces of the United States are loaded with Texans and often dominated by Texans. Even the dearly loved spectacular sports are run almost like military operations. Sectional football games have the glory and despair of war, and when a Texas team takes the field against a foreign state, it is an army with banners.”

While it is interesting to learn that so many famous people hail from the Lone Star State, it is also interesting to learn that most of the founders of Texas came here from other places. Sam Houston and Stephen F. Austin were born in Virginia. William B. Travis and James Bonham came from South Carolina. James Bowie was from Kentucky. The Alamo defenders came from 20 states and six countries. There were only 11 native Texians at the Alamo and they couldn’t speak English. Twenty-two of the defenders just appeared, and no one knows where they were born. 

At San Jacinto, the Texas Army came from 24 states, 11 countries, and Texas. The only native Texians were 30 Tejanos from San Antonio. “A scene singularly wild and picturesque presented itself to our view. Around 20 or 30 campfires stood as many groups of men: English, Irish, Scots, Mexicans, French, Germans, Italians, Poles, Yankees, all unwashed and unshaved, their long hair and beards and mustaches matted, their clothes in tatters and plastered with mud. A more savage-looking band could scarcely have been assembled.” Some things never change. 

All these newcomers give fresh meaning to the bumper sticker; “I’m not from Texas, but I got here as soon as I could.” This also includes Dr. Michael DeBakey (Lake Charles), Walter Cronkite (Saint Joseph, MO) and Roger Clemens (Dayton, OH).

Getting back to those who were born here, the Texans have rather dominated the evil media, especially the TV news. We have Dan Rather (Wharton). Then there are Bob Schieffer (Austin) and Scott Pelly (San Antonio). Lou Dobbs is not from Childress, but from “Childress County.” When it comes to athletes, we can’t list them all. Nolan Ryan (Refugio), Ben Hogan (Stephenville), A.J. Foyt (Houston), most of the NFL, Roger Hornsby (Winters), “Babe” Didrikson Zaharias (Port Arthur) and a newly pardoned Jack Johnson (Galveston). Incidentally, Johnson fits into a sub-category:
BOI. That’s Born On the Island (of Galveston).
The BOIs are very proud of that, although most are descendants of Jean Lafitte.

Only two U.S. Presidents were born here, Ike and Lyndon Johnson (Stonewall). Since Jim Hogg, most of our governors were Texan-born. George W. Bush was an exception (New Haven, CT). In other areas, we have Dr. Denton Cooley (Houston), former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor (El Paso), H. Ross Perot (Texarkana), Katherine Anne Porter (Indian Creek), Howard Hughes (Houston), painter Robert Rauschenberg (Port Arthur) and Gene Roddenberry (El Paso). 

Who was the first white female to be born in Texas? It could be Mary James Long, or maybe not. On December 21, 1821, Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long gave birth to Mary James on Bolivar Peninsula, and throughout Jane Long’s life she claimed to having given birth to the first white baby in Texas and was called “The Mother of Texas.” However, censuses between 1807 and 1826 reveal a number of children born in Texas to Anglo-American mothers prior to 1821. Stephen F. Austin is called “The Father of Texas,” and he once romanced Jane Long. Hmmmm.

Finally, also born in Texas were Bonnie and Clyde (Rowena and Ellis County, respectively), and Barrow and David Koresh of the Waco siege fame (Houston). Let’s assume they forged their birth certificates. H

The Henderson

December 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Features, Travel Blog

What do you get when you put Turks-and-Caicos-like beaches, a splash of Southern hospitality and a touch of New England-style-coastal-town feel in a blender? You’ll find out soon…

by Amanda Altman


I’m sitting on the beach—not on a chaise lounge, though there’s no shortage of ’em—but the actual beach. The sand is blindingly white, and feels more like silky cake flour than grainy particles of aged rock. The water is that murky mix of shimmering green and clear blue; if you stare at it for too long like I’ve been doing for the past hour, you’ll be transported to a trance-like state. It’s early May, and the sun is warm and bright, the air is casually breezy. Waves crashing and sea birds shrilling aside, it’s eerily quiet as a chipper waitress comes to take my order. I’ll have a bloody Mary, extra spicy, extra celery, thank you very much.

Not quite sure where I’m at?

Well, after two drinks, neither am I.

But then I turn around and it comes back in waves. No, I’m not on some remote Caribbean island named for some saint I can’t really pronounce. No, I’m not jet-lagged on the shores of Sicily
or Sardinia.

“Is there anything else I can get you, ma’am,” the chipper waitress asks, when it hits me harder than when I fell off my paddleboard a few hours earlier. I’m in America, less than a two-hour flight from Houston. I’m at The Henderson in Destin. That’s in—wait for it—Florida.

ROOM TO THE RESCUE

If you’ve never been to Florida’s Northwest Gulf Coast, you might not believe that such beaches exist in the States, let alone in the South. At the The Henderson, a Salamander Beach and Spa Resort, the Southern hospitality you’ve come to expect gets an unexpected twist. Despite having your usual creature comforts, the resort feels nostalgically reminiscent of a New England-style coastal town, almost like you’re on the set of a Nicholas Sparks film. 

Admittedly, The Notebook isn’t for everyone, but The Henderson decidedly is. Thanks to shingled roofs and steep gable rooflines, the drive up to the entrance makes you wonder if you’re about to enter a time machine. But when you step foot in the lobby, with its “new smell” smell and aesthetic that conjures up images of a luxurious ski lodge in Aspen, it’s obvious that you’re in 2018.

The not-even-two-year-old property feels intimate—but not too intimate—decked out with local artwork and housing 170 guest rooms, with views ranging from beach to garden. I opted for one of 16 Spa Rooms, which don’t spare any detail, from the super-plush beds, porcelain bathtub, spa-grade products and huge closet, to the yoga mat and gear. There’s an outdoor space, where you can sip your Nespresso in your robe, and maybe even dine on a bento-style breakfast box from room service. Trust me, you’ll want to move in.

#BEACHLIFE

After unpacking literally (my luggage) and figuratively (my stress from home) in my room, followed by a quick meditation, I hoist myself up from the thick mattress and out the door, beach bag in tow.

But first…coffee.

Following a quick stop at the free java and tea service in the lobby, I head outdoors to find two large outdoor pools—one cabana-clad pool for adults only (hooray!), and one with a lazy river for the kids. There’s also a sprawling, green-grass-covered lawn with games. I quickly learn that, although little ones are welcomed, you don’t even notice them at The Henderson.

After some poolside lounging and reading, I get restless. I can’t wait another minute to step foot onto the sand and inhale the salty ocean air. The Henderson isn’t directly on the beach, but it’s just a three-minute jaunt to their private beach area, where you can seamlessly arrange for beach sets (chairs, umbrellas, towels) and water activities (kayaks, boogie boards and paddleboards). Speaking of seamless, that’s exactly how I’d describe their staff; it’s the rare place where each and every employee seems genuinely happy to be working, and their service reflects that.

If you’re not keen on the water, you also have the option to rent a bicycle and tour the area, or hike the 200-acre preserve right next door. Off-site, you can arrange for a fishing trip (Destin is The World’s Luckiest Fishing Village, after all), tee up on Arnold Palmer–designed courses, shop for bargains at the nearby outlets and more. Just make sure to drop the kids off at the resort’s day camp first (score!).

STILL FULL

I’m getting hungry just thinking about all the stuff to do at The Henderson. The good news is that there are eight places to dine or grab a drink, ranging from fine dining to beach eats.

Primrose, the resort’s crown jewel, lives up to the hype. From the artful sushi to the huge, family-sized paella and the best dessert I’ve ever had—think chocolate lava cake covered in torched marshmallow—I certainly don’t leave hungry. Also amazing: the customized cocktails and attentive servers at Horizons, the spot with more casual bar service. Although I don’t have the stomach for Sprinkles, the aptly named ice cream parlor (too. much. marshmallow. cake.), it looked super fun for kids and adults alike.

A NEW-AGE SPA EXPERIENCE

With all that indulging, I was thankful for the fitness scene at The Henderson. There’s a spacious workout area with ample cardio and weight equipment, and workout classes at the movement studio. The outdoor spin area with breathtaking beach views is pure Instagram gold.

Post-workout, I clean up in the experiential shower at the world-class Salamander Spa (complete with a Himalayan salt room and hydrotherapy area, too). There’s a touchscreen that allows you to customize everything from the water pressure to the music and lights. Then, I bliss out with the Tibetan Bowl Ritual, ($140 for 50 minutes), which combines vibrational energy work—via traditional singing bowls made from a variety of metals, including gold—and massage. Although I was a bit skeptical of its purported benefits, it was somehow intensely anxiety-relieving and energizing at the same time.

By the end of my long-weekend-stay, although I certainly didn’t want to leave the Ryan Gosling vibes behind, I feel recharged and ready to head back to reality, where I certainly know where I am at all times. Until next time, Destin. H

Holiday Gift Guide

November 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Features

As the holidays approach, H Texas Magazine offers this list of some sweet stocking stuffers.

For the Health Nut

A better-for-you sweet snack, Nature Nate’s Honey Co. www.naturenates.com is packed their 100% Pure, Raw and Unfiltered honey into the perfect pouch for snacking. Nature Nate’s Honey Packets are a great allergy-friendly and delicious sweet treat kids will love to see in their stocking come Christmas morning.

 

 

 

For the Wine Lover

Savino Connoisseur Wine Saving Carafe

  • Designed to maintain fresh wine for up to a week
  • Float rests on top of the wine preventing oxidation
  • Carafe and lid are made of high-quality flint glass
  • Plastic float is BPA free and is designed to very stringent dimensions
  • Lid with rubber seal prevents spills
  • Holds a standard bottle of wine (750 ML)
  • Fits in most refrigerators (10.5 inches tall)
  • Available in glass or plastic, for outdoor adventures
  • MSRP: $49.95 (glass), $24.95 (plastic)

 For the Man Who Loves Quality

The editors of The Robb Report have created a unique gift box for men: Robb Vices. This subscription box gives you a monthly dose of luxury. Robbvices.com

 

 

 

 

For the Book Worm

1,000 Books to Read Before You Die by James Mustich (October 2; $35.00) has been 14 years in the making with a thousand great books to get lost. It’s a 1,000 page shelf talker curated by a literary expert. You’ll want to read every book Jim discusses. www.workman.com

 

 

 

For the Entertainer

Dos Ron 8 Year Rum is your spirit of choice a fine whisky, scotch, or bourbon? Then you will enjoy the golden hues, exotic aromas, and diverse flavor notes of Dos Ron. Forget Jim, Jack, or Johnnie…Instead, opt for a gift with distinction, character, and sophistication. The rich taste of Dos Ron 8 Year Rum is great on the rocks and also blends well with cola, fruit juice, or your favorite mixer; while the bountiful, complex flavor profile of Dos Ron 16 Year Rum strike the perfect balance of heat and smoothness and is best enjoyed neat or on the rocks.

 

Semi-Precious Agate Coaster Set

Semi-precious Agate Coaster Set’s classic design makes the perfect gift. Named after the Portuguese word “stone”, these coasters are authentically created from pure, semi-precious agate. Each coaster is hand- polished in Brazil and protected by rubber feet on the underside.  (Note: due to the natural variation of the stone, color and size may vary; retail $80.)

 

 

For the Sportsman

The Texas Flannel Sport Shirt is the perfect button down no matter where the cooler Texas winds take you. These made-in-Texas shirts feature a hidden button-down collar and corner-cut sleeve cuffs. The Texas flannel fabric is a lightweight, super soft, pure cotton that is stitched together by third-generation shirt makers in west Texas. From the ranch-house to the clubhouse, our Texas flannels are tough to beat. Exact same fit as the Standard Sport Shirt—not too slim, and never boxy (available in Field, Club and Ranch; $99.50). www.Texas-Standard.com

  • Made in Texas
  • Hidden button-down collar
  • Rugged 100 percent brushed cotton fabric
  • Designed with a length that also wears well untucked
  • Discrete front-pocket logo tag
  • Cut true to size: not boxy or too slim

For the Boot Lover 

The perfect gift for all of the important women, men and children in your life, Miron Crosby’s handmade boots are a memorable gift they can wear for years to come. Offered in a variety of styles, the luxe line of boots are hand-lasted in Texas at a 160-year-old manufacturer where master artisans with decades of experience cut, last and stitch every pair by hand. Concierge design service allows clients to customize any boot with an array of colored leathers and threads as well as personalize with monograms. Clients can even inscribe a personal message to the interior shaft of the boot!

For the Dreamer

Give the gift everyone has on their wish list…more SLEEP! The Dreampad is a clinically proven and researched Smart Pillow that actually helps its users shut down for a good night’s sleep! It’s a perfect gift choice for anyone who has a hard time falling asleep or staying asleep, or those who travel frequently and find themselves struggling to get shut eye in hotel rooms and unfamiliar spaces. The Dreampad plays music through a patented method which triggers the body’s relaxation response and signals your body and mind to relax. Through the app, you have access to 10 different song choices, volume control and length of play.  Once your head is relaxed on the Dreampad, the music travels internally signaling your body’s natural relaxation response so you can ease into a great night’s sleep!

The Dreampad is available in a variety of sizes to fit every sleep style, including Memory Support, Firm Support, Medium Support, and Slim Support (Great for Travel). Retails between $129 and $179.

For your Girlfriend or Bestie

Athleisure is all the rage… especially in H-Town where we really can wear leggings anywhere! These cute sets and lightweight mats from Manduka make for a great gift for your girl

friend or your best friend. They are easy to wear and look chic while working out. Prices range from $52–$128.

 

On the Menu

October 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Features, On the Menu

A Reason for the Season

The latest restaurant trend to source local, sustainable ingredients is gaining steam. Here’s how to implement it in your Texas kitchen.

Story and recipes by Tom Flynn

Seasonal ingredients locally sourced from sustainable suppliers are the future for restaurants, at least according to Current’s executive chef, Richard Mendoza, who preaches on creating ecologically sound menus. I’ve heard the sermon. Sitting at his desk wearing his tall chef’s hat with his feet flat on the floor, he spits fire and brimstone rhetoric on the sins of the food business. To paraphrase him: “Thou shalt not order product from California and waste hundreds of gallons on fuel having it delivered to Texas. Thou shalt not support a supplier who spits emissions into the air, or harms our streams, lakes or oceans. Thou shalt not serve aging and wilting ingredients that rode on a truck from afar. Thou shalt honor world-classic dishes created from fresh local ingredients.” Amen, brother.

I travel all over the world researching our “On the Menu” features. The kitchen at the Westin in The Woodlands (in which Current resides) is the most professional I’ve ever seen, from the facilities to the staff and processes. I spent an afternoon listening to their culinary philosophy and cooking secrets. When it came time to practice the recipes I learned, I realized how true they were to the chef’s philosophy. I ventured out to the beach, snagged a couple redfish and harvested crabs from my traps. I purchased dairy products, corn, edible flowers and shallots from Central Market. Virtually everything else came out of my garden. Get ready for a fresh, real Texas meal. H

Dinner with H Texas (Left to Right): Yennie Handika, Stephanie DiCiro, Vicki Dill, Thomas Gruber, Jasmine Chen and Marian Jacob

Tomato Burrata Salad

Place a mound of Burrata cheese in the center of a plate. Cut a variety of heirloom tomatoes into slices or wedges and scatter around the cheese, making sure not to overcrowd. Season the tomatoes and cheese with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Drizzle lemon-infused extra-virgin olive oil and white balsamic vinegar over the tomatoes. Garnish with micro arugula, basil and edible flowers.

Lump Crab Cake with Creamed Corn and Romesco Sauce

Traditionally, Romesco sauces are pepper and tomato based, but this one is all about the peppers. A combination of roasted red bell peppers and dried ancho chiles makes for some rich, smoky notes that pair surprisingly well with the sweet crab and corn.

For the creamed corn:
3 ears corn
3 cups heavy cream
2 tablespoons olive oil
¼ cup diced red onions
½ cup diced green bell peppers
salt and pepper to taste

For the sauce:
3 red bell peppers
¾ cup vegetable oil|
½ cup almonds
1 loaf white bread, cubed
3 garlic cloves
½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 tablespoons Red wine vinegar
1 small shallot
1 (1-ounce) package ancho chiles, rehydrated
salt and pepper to taste

For the crab cakes:
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 celery stalk, minced
¼ yellow onion, minced
4 fresno peppers, seeded and diced
½ green bell pepper, diced
½ tablespoon minced garlic
2 cups fresh bread, cubed
½ cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons Old Bay seasoning
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
2 tablespoons minced chives, plus more for garnish
1 pound jumbo lump crab

1. Make the corn: Shuck the corn, and then remove the kernels and set them aside.
2. Place the corn cobs and cream in a pot over medium-low and and simmer for 20 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, warm the oil in a skillet over medium and sauté the onions, peppers and reserved corn kernels for 3–5 minutes. Strain the cream and add to the skillet. Allow to reduce and thicken to your desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper.
4. Make the sauce: Roast the bell peppers over an open flame, cover, steam, then peel off the skin. Warm the oil in a skillet over medium and lightly toast the almonds, bread, garlic and pepper flakes. Place the roasted peppers and skillet mixture (including the oil) in a blender and puree with the remaining ingredients, adding water if needed to thin. Season with salt and pepper.
5. Make the crab cakes: Warm 1 tablespoon oil in a pan over medium and sauté the celery, onions, both peppers and garlic, until translucent. Remove from the heat and let cool.
6. Combine the bread, mayo, seasoning, parsley, chives and cooled vegetables in a bowl until incorporated. Gradually add the crab, being careful not to overmix and break up the crab. Shape the mixture into patties. Warm the remaining oil over medium-high and cook the crab cakes on both sides until golden brown, about 2 minutes.
7.
Serve the crab cakes with the creamed corn and Romesco sauce on the side, garnished with chives.


To get more On the Menu recipes and a speciality cocktail check out the Top Doc 2018 issue.

Fighting for Houston

September 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Features

Houston Texans cornerback Kareem Jackson isn’t just battling for wins on the football field. The family man also spearheads the Kareem Jackson Foundation, which aims to help cancer patients and their loved ones live a better life.

by Rima Jean • photography by Nicholas Nguyen

Kareem Jackson is channeling his inner Tyson Beckford for a photo shoot at Discovery Green, when he calls out, “Modeling is hard. Harder than playing football.” Considering how easy he makes playing football look, this isn’t surprising in the least coming from the quiet, humble Jackson.

Jackson, 30, grew up in Macon, GA, and developed a passion for football in high school. He was recruited by the University of Alabama, where he played cornerback for the Crimson Tide. In 2010, Jackson was drafted by the Houston Texans, and he’s been here ever since, now in his ninth season. Lately things have been especially busy: He and his wife, Amber, recently closed on a house in Florida so his family could be close by during training. They’re also expecting their second child, a girl, in June. Their first, Kaylen, is two.

In Fighting Shape

Despite having his hands full, Jackson stays game-ready between seasons with cardio. Lots and lots of it. Early on in the off-season, Jackson starts off by running a few miles on the treadmill. He progresses to sprint work, hills, and then to speed workouts. “I never want to have to get back into shape,” he says. “I want to stay in shape, even when I’m not playing football.” Admittedly, this can be difficult, especially considering his penchant for sweets. “I love fresh-baked chocolate chip cookies…and any kind of fruity candy, like Skittles, Sour Patch Kids…and Krispy Kreme doughnuts. Yeah, those things give me a hard time, for sure.”

Luckily, he enjoys the process of burning off those extra calories. “You gotta have fun with whatever you’re doing. Sure, you gotta put the work in, so you may as well have fun doing it.”

A Family Man

Off the field, Jackson dabbles as an entrepreneur with his clothing line, Fly Guy (flyguyshop.com), which features high-end lounge and streetwear for men. The line, Jackson says, is for men “who like to make a statement with their wardrobe.”

Jackson also spends his leisure time enjoying everything Houston has to offer: He loves hanging courtside at Rockets games, which he does often, or going bowling with buddies. He’s also no stranger to the city’s restaurant scene (see “Kareem’s Favorite Houston Eateries” below).

He admits to being a homebody, however, and prefers spending time in his “man cave” with friends, his three dogs—an Argentine Dogo, a French bulldog and a Chihuahua—and above all, with his family. “My little girl is growing every day, learning new words every day,” beams Jackson. “I don’t want to miss that. My family is definitely my priority.” A quick scroll down his Instagram feed, teeming with photos of him, his wife and his daughter smiling from ear to ear, is proof enough.

Conquering Cancer

Perhaps the second-biggest contribution of his time goes into his campaign against cancer, a cause very close to Jackson’s heart. “I started the Kareem Jackson Foundation a while back, but it’s really taken off recently,” he says. “My mom is a two-time breast cancer survivor and my sister is a leukemia survivor, so I guess you can imagine what my childhood household was like. I decided that once I was in a position where I could help people and families affected by cancer, I would jump at the opportunity.”

As Jackson’s brand grew, he was able to conceive his dream and the foundation took off. The foundation hosts a variety of fund-raisers each year, with the money raised going directly toward various programs that raise cancer awareness and provide educational, recreational and healthy-living initiatives for families affected by breast cancer and childhood cancer. Such programs include Christmas in July, which provides gifts to kids battling cancer and their siblings; the Pretty in Pink VIP Luncheon, which honors breast cancer fighters and survivors; and Texan for a Day, which provides families of children battling cancer with a free VIP day at the Houston Training Camp at Reliant Stadium. On May 22 Jackson and his teammates are teeing up at Topgolf Houston-Katy with a live and silent auction; the proceeds will go toward these initiatives. (For more information, visit kareemjackson.org.)

Jackson’s charity efforts don’t end there—the Texans cornerback is also active with the Candlelighters of Texas Children’s Hospital, a group that provides emotional, educational and practical support to families of children with cancer. “I do a lot of work with them every year, too,” Jackson says. “Anything to keep families from going through what we went through.”

Looking to the Future

In terms of his football career and the upcoming season, Jackson is optimistic. “The locker room has been pretty upbeat. We went through a lot last year, a lot of injuries, but at the end of the day, we all have the same goal. Getting our guys healthy again is definitely a priority. We’re putting last year behind us and looking forward to this year.” He smiles. “We just want to win.”

“Houston is home,” Jackson says definitively. “I love it here. It has so much to offer. This will definitely be home for me and my family when I’m done playing ball.”

As long as the modeling days are held to a minimum. H

Kareem’s Favorite Houston Eateries

“I’m a huge foodie,” Jackson admits. “And Houston’s got so many great choices.” Here, his top picks.

  • Willie G’s
  • Steak 48
  • Killen’s STQ
  • Blaze Pizza
  • Zaxby’s

Game On

April 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Features

by Rima Jean

Don’t let Lindsay McCormick’s appearance fool you. She might be small and blonde—and a woman—but the host of Super Bowl XLIX is a sports authority to be reckoned with.

“I grew up in a huge sports family,” explains the sportscaster, who also covered the most anticipated fight of the decade, Mayweather vs. Pacquiao. “My entire family is obsessed with sports. So for me it was like, either learn to love it, or hate your life.”

Getting ready for her career in broadcasting, a young McCormick practiced on her stuffed animals.

A native Houstonian, McCormick became involved in sports and cheerleading at an early age. Her grandfather was drafted to play football for the Washington Redskins, and both he and McCormick’s brother went on to work for NASCAR. McCormick attended Auburn University in Alabama, where she got involved with the campus news station. When the resident sports anchor went out of town one weekend, McCormick was asked to cover the Auburn football games. She immediately fell in love with it. “When he came back to town, I refused to let him have his job back,” McCormick admits with a laugh.

One weekend, McCormick was on the sidelines covering Auburn play LSU, and ESPN’s College Gameday was in town and saw her in action. “They offered me a job as an intern with ESPN SportsCenter, and that was how, at 20 years old, my career started.”

McCormick’s expertise isn’t limited to football, either: She’s covered basketball—she was the sideline reporter for the quarterfinals of ESPN’s The Basketball Tournament—as well as boxing, covering the Timothy Bradley vs. Jessie Vargas fight, among others. McCormick contends, “I’ve had my fair shake with just about every sport, except baseball.” However with the Astros’ World Series championship win, she hopes to add it to her repertoire.

Her resume is impressive: McCormick was the stage host for Super Bowl Sponsor SAP alongside Marshall Faulk in San Francisco and served as NBC’s Sunday Night Football Social Host; she’s hosted the 2012 NFL Draft for CBS Sports, The Fan on Comcast SportsNet and was a panel analyst for Rip City Live. She also appeared on ESPN.com’s Streak for the Cash and ESPN College Pick’em and MTVU’s The Dean’s List.

Breaking the Glass Ceiling

With McCormick’s success in a male-dominated industry, there’s no avoiding the question of how she, a woman, made it to where she is today. “When I started 10 years ago, there were only a handful of women reporting sports. Erin Andrews was just getting started, Suzy Kolber had been there for some time, Linda Cohn…these were all women I looked up to, and they paved the way for other women to come into the field.”

Even with the help of these trailblazers, McCormick concedes it wasn’t easy. “I would go into these interviews knowing I had a lot to prove. I was going up against all of these men, and I had to prove my sports knowledge. The first question I would get was, ‘Why would our audience believe you?’” McCormick chuckles at the memory. “In hindsight, it was a huge insult, but at the time I thought it was normal. I felt I had to work twice as hard to prove to an audience that I knew what I was talking about.”

The boxing world, she reveals, has even fewer female broadcasters. “I’m hoping I can help change that over time.”

No Place Like Home

Despite her jet-setting lifestyle, McCormick recently bought a home in Houston in her childhood neighborhood, where her parents still live. She was in H Town, in fact, during Hurricane Harvey. “I drove out to stay with my parents when it happened. Our entire neighborhood got flooded. We stayed up for two nights straight in parkas holding buckets, trying to keep the water from coming into our home.”

McCormick celebrates the Astros’ World Series Game 5 win with her family.

Hurricane Harvey was a tragedy, and one that many Houstonians are still dealing with. “It’s amazing to see how the city has bounced back,” McCormick says. “And I think the Astros have a lot to do with that. Their win helped the city shift their focus from a tragedy to something that binds us together. I love how sports have the ability to do that.”

A Bright Future

McCormick can currently be seen in the romantic comedy The Bounce Back, available on Amazon Video and iTunes, playing a talk show host opposite Shemar Moore. She is also working on an augmented reality sports game for ePlay with fellow sports commentator and NBA champion and former Houston Rocket Robert Horry. “He was one of my favorite athletes growing up, and I’m so excited to work with him on this.”

As for whether she’ll be spending more time here in Houston? “I hope so. I go back and forth between here and California, but maybe I can finally learn some more about baseball by hanging out with the ‘Stros…”


Get the Lindsay Look

Just how does she get that glow? Here are her best camera-ready secrets.

Number-one beauty must-have: Resurface by Shani Darden Retinol Reform. It’s magical. Every celebrity you’ve ever seen with flawless skin either visits Shani Darden as a facialist or uses her serum.

Nighttime miracle-worker: I use the Deesse Professional LED Facial at night. It’s this red-light therapy that helps to boost collagen production and heals the skin quickly.

Drugstore find: Garnier Skinactive Moisture Bomb Sheet Mask. The masks hydrate your skin and leaves it feeling super soft.

Favorite ways to stay fit: I adore ballroom dancing as a form of exercise. I’ve been dancing since I was two years old, and started competing at the age of seven. Unfortunately, I threw my neck out doing a dip, but the injury introduced me to Pilates, which I’ve incorporated into my workouts. Pilates has been the best at helping me recover from my dance injuries while keeping me fit. It just transforms your body, and it’s perfect for someone like me, who is always on the go.

Gather at the Green

March 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Features

City living got you down? There’s a new trend developing in Fredericksburg, Texas, that just might inspire your next move.

For all of the modern conveniences that living in a bustling city center provides, there’s an equally long list of discomforts. (We’re looking at you, traffic.) Fortunately for those looking to buck the urban trend in favor of something more serene, there’s a new real estate craze in action. People are heading to the proverbial hills to take advantage of a style of spacemaking that centers residential developments not around golf courses, pools or clubhouses, but orchards, community gardens and other natural features.

But what exactly is the allure? At Hidden Springs, Texas’ latest iteration of “farm-to-table” living taking shape on 753 acres just outside of Fredericksburg, there’s a bevy of attractive features that just might inspire you to kiss your city-slicking days goodbye. Here are a few of the most alluring.  

The Green: 30 Acres of Nature

The shining centerpiece of Hidden Springs is its organized natural space, The Green. Accessible to all Hidden Springs residents, it will include an expansive walking and hiking trail surrounded by natural vegetation and wildflowers (some specifically planted to attract certain species of birds, bees and butterflies), plus spring-fed community gardening spaces, orchards and vineyards. There will also be an open-air pavilion, playgrounds and a dog run for residents’ use, plus meditation stations and a fishing pond for relaxation seekers. Hidden Springs is also home to a family of majestic Dall Sheep, who are also welcome guests to The Green.

Credit: Shutterstock

Spacious Lots For Your Homestead, Your Horses and More

Hidden Springs lots come in five- and 10-acre varieties, carry ag-exempt status that owners can choose to keep for tax benefits, and provide chemical-free well water. (In fact, families that secure a homesite before April 1 can have a well drilled for free.) Homes at Hidden Springs pay homage to the natural Texas Hill Country landscape through complementary building materials and architecture.

Location, Location, Location

When you do have to venture out of your private gated community into town, it’ll be easy enough to have you forgetting that you’ve traded your urban ways for a life of simplicity. Hidden Springs is just a 15-minute drive from Fredericksburg, and only 10 minutes away from the nearest HEB. If you do ever need to scratch your city itch, drive to either San Antonio in less than an hour or Austin in less than two hours.  

Impressively High-Tech Amenities

Just because you’re heading into the wild doesn’t mean that you have to forfeit any of your technology; in fact, Hidden Springs will help you embrace it. The development will be outfitted with 1 Gigabit fiber optic internet and underground utilities, so you can stay as connected or unplugged as you see fit.

Fall Entertaining Tips

November 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Dining, Features

by Cassidy Irish

Texas-based blogger and lifestyle expert Caroline Harper Knapp knows about effortless, seasonal entertaining and style. She recently hosted a Summer Soirée in Dallas featuring Cointreau, the orange liqueur. Knapp began hosting events while living in NYC, and continues to do so in her current hometown of Houston. Here are some of her tips for throwing a flawless party:

Make a Strong First Impression. “Fresh cocktails and inspired décor help set the tone—whether you’re entertaining friends, family or out of town guests, if you greet them with a great-tasting cocktail, it elevates the occasion and lends a personal touch for a memorable moment.”

Set the Scene. “A white base is a no-fail foundation for any Instagram-worthy tablescape. Start with a collection of basic white dishware, then have fun layering in colorful flatware, tablecloths, napkins and glasses. Flowers are a beautiful addition, and can tie in nicely to themes without being overpowering. Décor should be simple and light—adding pops of color in a tasteful way, and should remain in one color family.”

Host a Bar Cart. “Essential to effortless entertaining, a bar cart is the perfect moment to reveal cocktails you’ll be serving. It acts as a mobile kitchen most days—great for meetings and hosting guests. On it you can always find pops of greenery, fun glassware, personal mementos, and my favorite spirit Cointreau to create hand-crafted cocktails.”

A lot of planning goes into entertaining, and it’s important the host enjoys the event as much as her guests. With these tips, you will be able to throw a fabulous party and entertain in style! Check out Knapp’s blog at houseofharper.com.

Retreat at the Ranch

October 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Features

Rancho la Puerta, a luxury wellness resort in the Baja region of Mexico, revives and reboots the mind, body and spirit, making for an unforgettable getaway with memories that will last a lifetime.

by Nicholas Nguyen

After months of back-to-back deadlines, you could say that I needed a vacation. Badly. So when I got an invitation to visit Rancho La Puerta, a resort nestled in the hills and valleys in Tecate, Mexico, it was just the ticket I was hoping for.

Little did I know just how different Rancho La Puerta was from the average Mexican getaway. Instead of the usual crowded pools and long buffet lines, the intimate resort is dedicated to wellness, to helping guests relax and recharge through a variety of classes and workshops (that of course, includes plenty of spa time and delicious cuisine). Lovingly dubbed by guests as “the Ranch,” Rancho La Puerta attracts visitors from all across the country, and from Houston, it’s a short flight to San Diego and a quick bus ride across the border.

I would never have known that the city existed around the Ranch unless I hadn’t passed through on the drive in. The lush, green grounds house hacienda-style villas, which are newly renovated and complete with gorgeous views of the hills or one of the resort’s four pools. Immediately, I was truly able to unplug from the rest of the world, especially since the resort only offers Wi-Fi and television in a few select lounges and the lobby.

On that first day, I received a folder that detailed the week’s activities and events; I had chosen to visit during a special Pilates Week. Every single day, there were activities from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.; there were so many options that often I wished I had a time machine so I could try them all. Since science hasn’t made my Back to the Future dreams a reality yet, I took a deep breath and reminded myself that I was also supposed to take this time to slow down. Here’s how I reinvigorated my mind, body and spirit in just one week.

MIND

Spend the early morning relaxing in your room before taking off for some exercise.

It’s always hard for me to shut my mind off, but at the Ranch I only had myself to focus on—and no smartphone in sight—so it felt a little easier to let go. Being an artist by nature, I loved the creative outlets at the ranch, which complemented all of the physical activity.

MEDITATION AND HEALING At Rancho La Puerta, there’s no shortage of activities for decompressing and clearing your head. Guided meditation and yoga are obvious choices, but for a unique and tranquil experience, try Sound Healing. A guide plays sounds from large, resonant crystal bowls to help you completely relax and lull you into a stress-free state. At least half of the class participants dozed off midway through the session (which is fine as long as you have a friend who will poke you if you start snoring), but everyone came out of it feeling rejuvenated.

ARTISTIC ENDEAVORS The ranch invites artists and writers to help guests flex their creative muscles. Take a watercolor, sketch, jewelry-making or sculpture class to create your own custom souvenir, which is a nice break from physical activities midday or a good way to unwind after dinner. While I visited, memoirist Larry Grobel (known for his books Conversations with Capote, Al Pacino and The Art of the Interview), led writing workshops that helped attendees dig deep and jot down short, but poignant pieces about their lives.

LIFESTYLE LECTURES During my stay, a few other special guests gave talks on a variety of health-related subjects. Dr. Rubin Naiman, a clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Arizona, lectured on how to overcome sleep problems and opened our minds on the science and psychology of dreams. Professor Emerita Beverly Whipple spoke about sexual health and intimacy in a really relatable way.

BODY

On the trail for the breakfast hike, which leads to the ranch’s organic farm and breakfast to boot.

In 2016, I started a fitness journey that included learning Pilates to stay healthy and prevent any issues that may come up as I age. Choosing to visit during Rancho La Puerta’s Pilates Week—offered several times throughout the year—was a no-brainer. In addition to the numerous Pilates classes offered, there were so many other workout options—some of which I’d never even heard before! To fuel my active schedule, I ate delicious food, and didn’t skip breakfast once (like I’m guilty of doing at home).

SWEAT SESSIONS There are too many cardio-centered classes to name, but if you want to get your heart rate pumping, Zumba, Cycling or Cardio Drum Dance—where you work your entire body while banging on giant barrels to energizing music—are some great options. After all of that action, cool off in the pools for a few laps, or take it further with a challenging water aerobics class. Even though I had trouble staying afloat and splashed around quite a bit, it was fun because I had taken it with a new friend, Ann Eshabarr, a dance teacher from San Francisco. She summed the exercise program up at the Ranch quite nicely: “The Ranch is like a well-oiled machine. They have made it very easy to navigate the classes even though the property is huge. I learned to take off in the morning with clothing for hiking, swimming, dance and Pilates so I was prepared for everything. I would be walking around and see a class I liked and drop right in!”

MIND/BODY BLISS Jennifer Lee Ho, a teacher trained in many different movement modalities from the Bay Area, led Pilates Week. I took two mat classes from her every morning—she, like many of the instructors at the Ranch, exuded a motivating, warm energy—and learned a lot about pelvic stability. (The Pilates studio at the Ranch also offers classes on the Pilates Reformer and other equipment.) A lot of my fellow Ranch-goers attended classes dedicated to stretching and tried Feldenkrais, which, similar to Pilates reinforces the mind-body connection.

ON THE MENU The Ranch’s all-inclusive program provides breakfast, lunch and dinner, all made with fresh, local ingredients; they even offer cooking classes. Like me, Jennifer has a love for food: “Though fitness is a priority in my life, eating properly (most of the time) is my other joy,” she told me. “It was fantastic to sit down for three organic and tasty meals a day with other interesting guests from all over the world.” Breakfast and lunch are buffet style, while dinner has service. At dinner, Ranch veterans let us in on a secret—you can sample both of the entrée options instead of choosing just one. I’m still dreaming about the fresh fish tacos we had for lunch one day and an amazing eggplant parmesan that was served for dinner.

SPA SERVICES There are separate spas for both women and men, along with two other treatment centers, so there’s no excuse not to treat yourself after a couple days of working out. The spa offers a wide range of massages and facials; I tried the classic Ranch massage with some aromatherapy one late afternoon, a perfect prelude to dinner. The women’s and men’s centers also have lockers for reservation so you can stash your belongings instead of lugging things around or having to return to your room.

SPIRIT

Dinner time is a joyous occasion every night.

I think the reason the Ranch has been thriving for so long is because of its lingering effect on you, even long after you’ve left. I met so many people who make it a tradition to visit every few years, and even make it a spot for special occasions like weddings, anniversaries and reunions. Mothers who visited the Ranch decades ago return with their daughters to relive the magic all over again. Here’s why.

THE SENSE OF COMMUNITY I think all the classes, from creative to fitness, help people open up. There isn’t a feeling like you’re being judged or a reason to feel self-conscious, like the way you might feel at a large gym, for example. Everyone is there to learn and share. Ann agrees: “I loved the sense of community with my fellow Ranchers. This took place mostly at mealtime, and I found it very interesting and humorous how most guests would tell you how many years they’ve been coming. It was a source of pride. Just for the record, five was a low number. Since I was a rookie, everybody was happy to help me acclimate.”

BONDS THAT LAST I traveled alone, but it was easy to make fast friends like I did with Ann and Jennifer. Many visitors travel with a friend or spouse, but I also met some larger groups, like 13 women who came together to celebrate a friend’s 50th. What was most surprising to me at first was meeting people who first met at the Ranch and now make it their tradition to come back together. Now that I’ve experienced what Rancho la Puerta offers, I understand it better—it’s an experience unlike any other that can tie you to strangers, and together, you forge something new. I will never forget all the laughter with Ann and trying so many new classes with her, nor will I forget the wisdom Jennifer generously imparted. See you soon at the Ranch, Ann and Jennifer! H

Houston: The Melting Pot

October 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Features

 

Not to mention the humidity.

by Lynn Ashby

Tan Tan, Dynasty Plaza, Fu Fu, lots of signs in Chinese that I can’t read. No, this is not downtown Hong Kong or Shanghai. It’s that wild and exotic bastion of mystery, noted for its international intrigue, crossroads of the world and multi-dialects: Bellaire Boulevard. In other neighborhoods you can see signs and hear languages in Vietnamese, Spanish, Arabic and even English. Austin may host the University of Texas. Houston hosts the Diversity of Texas, and the world. We have heard so much about our city’s diversity, maybe it’s getting to be old hat—or sombrero, yarmulke, Stetson. We have almost 12,000 Indians and Eskimos. Okay, to be PC, they’re Native-Americans and Alaska Natives, plus 304 Hispanic Hawaiians and Hispanic Pacific Islanders. Eleven of our 32 skyscrapers are fully or partially owned, or financed by foreign investors. We have more Muslims than Jews; at home 5,895 of us speak Tagalog (Filipinos).

Not to get bogged down by statistics, but Houston leads the Southwest with 19 foreign banks from nine nations. In addition, 14 foreign nations maintain trade and commercial offices here. We have 32 active foreign chambers of commerce and trade associations. Almost a quarter (24 percent) of Harris County residents were born not in a different Texas county, not in a different state, but in a different country. In this eight-county region, almost half of the foreign residents are relative newcomers, having entered the U.S. in the 1990s.

They have to live somewhere, so our new arrivals can search the Houston Assn. of Realtors’ properties database (har.com) in English, Spanish, Chinese, French, German, Italian and Vietnamese. The association’s more than 5,600 multilingual members can even tell you that if the house is dry, it’s underwater, a fixer-upper or on a fault line, and tell you that in 99 different languages. Students in the Houston school district speak 124 native languages at home, and at Bellaire High School, a language magnet school, the students can be taught any of 11 languages from Arabic to Hebrew, from Japanese to Mandarin Chinese. The main campus of UH last fall had 3,995 temporary foreign students. Of the total enrollment, 25 percent were white and 31 percent were Hispanic, and although Houston is 6 percent Asian-American, they make up 20 percent of the UH student body. Another good example of Houston’s role in the international scene is the Texas Medical Center. People come from all over the world to die in Houston. And most of them need translators to say, “Yes, I have health insurance.”

One reason for so many foreigners coming to Houston is that refugees like it here, and have for a long time. They arrive from everywhere: Syria, Nigeria, Brooklyn, Buffalo. Some 75,000 refugees have come to Houston in the past 35 years, which makes Houston the number-one city in the nation for these newcomers. Among the States, Texas leads the nation in refugee resettlement. It is home to 2,677 refugees who have been settled in the state since October 2015. Of these, a third were settled in Houston. Indeed, Houston is the U.N. General Assembly South. During a visit here in early June, Kelly T. Clements, of the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, called Houston’s open-arms approach, “a testament to the diversity and progressive nature of Houston.”

According to the Texas Department of State Health Services, Harris County received refugees from 40 different countries in the fiscal year of 2014. We don’t have any current data, since Texas ended its participation in the U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program in 2016 due to Gov. Greg Abbott’s fear that the feds couldn’t adequately guarantee that none of the newcomers would pose a security threat. To our surprise, the number of terrorist suicide bombings, lethal truck drivers and nightclub shootings within the Loop has been held to a relative minimum. Gov. Abbott released his statement withdrawing from the refugee program with a financial plea: “Will you support my campaign with a contribution to help fight the attacks on me coming from Washington?” So much for the state motto: friendship. One aspect of all this internationalism that’s especially appealing is the restaurant scene. It used to be the closest we could get to foreign food was the International House of Pancakes. Now in the Houston area there are 10,286 eating and drinking establishments, with 70 national categories. Houston is not so much a melting pot as a cafeteria.

LICENSED TO PARK FREE                                   

What with the Port of Houston, NASA, the Texas Medical Center and the awl bidness, Houston hosts the nation’s third-largest consular corps—behind New York City and Los Angeles—with 94 nations represented. The diplomats deal with their worried fellow citizens, more so now that the Trump Immigration Doctrine is in play. Some nations have full-time, career diplomats, and 43 are represented by noncareer, or honorary, diplomats. This brings us to all those consular license plates we see on cars around town. If the owner of the vehicle is a career diplomat then he or she files the proper papers with the U.S. State Dept., which authorizes the plate. Honorary consuls go through the Texas Dept. of Transportation. In either case, they pay what our diplomats pay in the country the consul represents. It’s called reciprocity. Sporting theses license plates does not give the consuls immunity from traffic tickets, but one benefit is they can park free at the short-term airport parking lots.

Over the years foreign counsels have said that Houston is considered good duty, although the job is mostly commercial work. There had long been a rumor that the British government considered Houston to be a hardship post because the city’s temperatures were similar to those of Bombay (now Mumbai), India, and Accra, Ghana. Actually, the diplomats here did not get hardship pay, but three years in Houston counted as four toward retirement. I broached this matter some time ago with the British consul general who said, “That’s true until I called Whitehall and said, ‘My, God. Haven’t you people ever heard of air conditioning?’” Incidentally, the British consulate here would put up a little sign in late June each year, “Due to circumstances beyond our control, we will be closed on the Fourth of July.” 

Finally on this international matter, adopt a consul. You may need the protection. When Houston was the capital of the Republic of Texas, across from where the Rice Lofts now stands was the U.S. Embassy. On Christmas Eve 1837, the town received a bulletin: 1,500 Mexican soldiers had retaken Bexar. Invasion was imminent. Mrs. Mary Austin Holly wrote: “We were at the house of Mr. Labranche (the U.S. minister), a good cabin—he promised us the protection of the flag if necessary.” The invaders never appeared, but you never know when you’ll need to flee to the safety of a foreign consulate, as I was telling Julian Assange.

Closer to home, it’s estimated that 250,000 Katrinians fled to Texas, mostly to the Houston area. Today, 40,000 of them are still here. Meanwhile, immigrants from south of the border have always come—and stayed. But Texas holds a particularly warm spot for youngsters from ravaged lands. They have fled the gangs, the drug lords, extortion, the midnight shootings and kidnappings, to ford the river and arrive in Texas. I wouldn’t want to live in Chicago, either. Youngsters also poured in from Central America, and of the estimated 58,000 who came to the U.S. in recent years, 40 percent arrived in Texas.

COWBOYS AND INDIANS

We like to call this sleepy fishing village on the bayou a “World Class City,” but maybe a “World City with Class” is better. Where else does the mayor’s office rent out flags for another country’s national day, or the birthday of your spouse from Croatia or maybe a visiting Saudi sheik? Daily fee rental is $10 per flag, or you can rent all of them for $500. “Please treat the flags with respect and courtesy,” the mayor warns, otherwise you will be hunted down by the French Foreign Legion, Scotland Yard or Canadian Mounties, depending on which nation you offend. When you drive along Will Clayton Parkway to the George H.W. Bush Intercontinental Airport and Trans-Galactic Star Terminal, can you spot the speed limit signs: “50 mph,” and below that, “80 km.” A nice touch for that visiting sheik anxious to make the last Emirate flight to Dubai.

WHO WAS THAT MOSQUE MAN?

An interesting sideshow of our changing population is our religions. Stephen L. Klineberg, founding director of The Kinder Institute for Urban Research, reports in his latest survey: “In all of the 35 consecutive surveys, the percentage of Protestants in the Harris County population has dropped from almost two thirds (63 percent) in 1982 to less than half (46 percent) in the most recent years.” Our Catholic percentage—bolstered by the influx of Hispanics, Filipinos and Vietnamese—has grown from 25 percent in the early 1980s to 31 percent. In recent years, Muslims, Buddhists and Hindus have also grown. Despite these many different sounds, smells and religions, we tend to get along. Sometime after World War I Houston Post columnist Hubert Mewhinney wrote, “Houston is a whiskey and trombone town.” Today Houston is more like a full bar and a multiethnic orchestra, all playing the same song. H

Sources: Kinder Houston Area Survey, U.S. Census, Houston Facts and my own ethnic restaurant hopping.

Ashby is 100 percent at ashby2@comcast.net.    

Best of HTexas 2017

October 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Features

Congratulations, Houston! We took centerstage during Super Bowl week. Like the Astros, we stepped up to the plate—and hit the ball out of the park. Selecting these winners was just a little easier this year, perhaps because we all brought our A game. Let’s keep the momentum going. (And oh, yeah, Lady Gaga rocks!)

by Laurette Veres, Shelby Reininger, Marian Jacobs, Candace Miller and Stephanie DiCiro

Eat & Drink

Best Steakhouse: Perry’s Steakhouse and Grille

Check out the Texas steakhouse champion! Perry’s award-winning menu and satisfying service makes it perfect for both business meetings and private events. With Perry’s, you’ll never worry where to take her for a romantic dinner. Make the night special with a selection of world-class wines or one of their flaming desserts.

perryssteakhouse.com


Best Tex-Mex: The Original Ninfa’s on Navigation

Craving real Tex-Mex? You can’t get more authentic than The Original Ninfa’s on Navigation. Dig into sizzling favorites like Mama Ninfa’s Original Tacos Al Carbon, Queso Flameado or Navigation’s Famous Bacon-Wrapped Shrimp Diablo. In 1973 when Mama Ninfa first created her famous fajitas from this very location, Ninfa’s own Alex Padilla was there, and in 2006 he returned to continue the tradition of serving up what’s known as “The best Mexican food in Texas.” Make no mistake, “There is only one original Ninfa’s on Navigation, and this is it!”

ninfas.com


Best Juice Bar: Nourish Juice and Smoothie Bar

You can always find your favorite veg on Nourish’s kaleidoscopic list of targeted juices. Each juice combination features vitamins and nutrients that provide different health benefits. Whether you’re looking for a healthy snack, to drop some pounds or just to drink some groovy juice, check out Nourish today.

ilovenourishjuicebar.com


Best Way to Buy a Cupcake: Sprinkles Cupcake ATM

What could be more satisfying than being able to purchase a cupcake all hours of the day? At Sprinkles Cupcake ATM, with just a touch of the screen and swipe of your card, you can do just that. If you just can’t get enough, come back during business hours, when, in addition to a variety of unique cupcake flavors, Sprinkles Highland Village location offers cookies, ice cream and other frozen treats. Located on Westheimer, just a mile east of the Galleria, this cupcake stop can easily gratify your sweet tooth 24/7.

sprinkles.com


Best Salad: Bubba Lump Salad at BB’s Café

Looking for a place to spend a summer Saturday night with old friends, good food and plenty of beer? The answer is BB’s Café! There are tons of authentic Cajun favorites on the menu, but if you want to lighten things up, go with the Bubba Lump. This signature salad combines boiled shrimp, lump crab meat, fresh tomato and avocado with refreshing lemon wedges and parmesan-garlic dressing. It’s perfect alone or alongside a cup of gumbo!

bbscafe.com


Best Sushi: Uchi Houston

James Beard Award–winning Chef Tyson Cole brings his signature brand of Japanese and modern French fusion to Houston with Uchi, a contemporary Japanese restaurant and sushi bar located at the corner of Westheimer and Montrose. The menu will refresh your idea of sushi as it combines traditional Japanese offerings with new textures and flavors and tapas-sized servings, making Uchi a one-of-a-kind experience not to be missed.

uchihouston.com


Best Dog-Friendly Restaurant: Empire Café

The Empire Café’s warm service, fabulous food and ample indoor and outdoor seating have made it a popular spot for years. With two pet-friendly patios, the Empire often attracts people walking their dogs. In fact, you’re likely to find several pooches there at any time, so feel free to bring your “best friend” to brunch. It’s also a great spot to sip your morning coffee, have a light lunch or dinner, or even a great glass of wine.

empirecafe.com


Best Brunch: Tiny Boxwoods

This elegant hidden brunch spot is the perfect atmosphere to enjoy a beautiful meal with friends or family, or to host an unforgettable event. Nestled in the lush surroundings of a nursery, this modern space has a rustic-chic feel and a menu focused on food made from scratch. Their mission is to offer good food from good places and elegant service in an inviting atmosphere. Don’t miss their most popular item, their legendary chocolate chip cookies, hot from the oven every 20 minutes. You won’t be disappointed.

tinyboxwoods.com


Best New Sports Bar: Biggio’s Sports Bar

Biggio’s is located in the fabulous new Marriott Marquis in Downtown Houston. Named after Houston Astros legend Craig Biggio, this new bi-level venue offers an exciting atmosphere, a menu full of Texas favorites and nonstop sports entertainment. Watch live games on two 30-foot HD screens while you browse their bar food Hall of Fame menu, which includes everything from pretzels, hot dogs and nachos to salmon nicoise and filet mignon. Biggio’s also serves up a wide selection of draft beers and unique signature cocktails. Win or lose, catching a game here will be an unforgettable night.

biggioshouston.com


Best Tacos: Torchy’s Tacos

Originating in Austin in 2006, one man’s street-food taco dream became a reality with a trendy food trailer and some “damn good” tacos. Using locally and responsibly sourced ingredients, Torchy’s now has 30 locations and a trailer park dedicated to creating edgy tacos that will keep you coming back for more, from a.m. to p.m. Be sure to wash them down with a Main Root soda and finish with some Lil’ Nookies, aka their devilish, deep-fried chocolate chip cookies. Their Taco of the Month just might turn you into a “Taco Junkie!”

torchystacos.com


Best Casual Lunch: The Black Walnut Cafe

The Black Walnut Café is the perfect setting to enjoy a meal with friends, a business chat, a drink and an appetizer, or a special occasion. With zero wait time, you can even make it a habit to stop in for freshly prepared comfort food. With menu items like The Litigator Salad, Anderson’s ‘Bout Time Chicken Sandwich, Lobster Tacos and Pot Roast Grilled Cheese, you’re bound to find something that caters to your every craving.

blackwalnutcafe.com


Best Vietnamese Restaurant: Le Colonial

Vietnamese has never been so French! Reminiscent of 1920s French Colonial Southeast Asia, this famed Vietnamese dining spot is located in the prestigious River Oaks District off Westheimer. Serving classic and upscale Vietnamese comfort food and unique French-Asian cuisine, Le Colonial features classic, upscale tropical Asian décor. Here in Houston, Le Colonial is the only place to have a Vietnamese royal dining experience among the thousands of Viet-Pho noodle cafes.   

lecolonialhouston.com


Best Macarons: Bite Macarons

Bonjour from Houston’s top French dessert spot! When you enter the Bite Macarons bakery, it feels like you’ve been transported to Tokyo…wait, why Tokyo? Isn’t this a French patisserie? Yes, but once you take in the immaculately clean, white interior, soft ambient lighting and bright contrasting colors of the exquisite macarons, Bite brings you to a French café on Tokyo’s petite street. Nevertheless, you’ll find the best macarons in the city!

teambite.com


Best Breakfast: The Breakfast Klub

Recognized as one of the “best breakfast restaurants in the nation,” The Breakfast Klub is a casual, family-style dining destination in Houston and a well-known hot spot for country-soul food. Houstonians and visitors alike have been lining up for 15 years to savor southern specialties like their fluffy, buttery Biskits and Gravy and signature Wings and Waffles. Open for breakfast and lunch, they even have a heart-healthy menu, but we suggest saving the diet for another day.

thebreakfastklub.com


Best New Hotel Bar: Bayou and Bottle, Four Seasons Hotel, Houston

This highly anticipated lobby bar opened to rave reviews just in time for the Super Bowl. With Four Seasons flair, the Bayou and Bottle is focused on introducing patrons to new bourbons and whiskeys with features like their Bourbon Steward and personalized bourbon lockers. Other features include a grab-and-go counter, the Angel’s Share private dining room and the first-ever Topgolf simulation experience. Best of all, the food is top-notch; choose from candied bacon, pimiento cheese crudités, sashimi, bone marrow and more. 

fourseasons.com/houston


Best Wine Presentation: Beaulieu Vineyard

Beaulieu Vineyards recently released Rarity 2013, a limited-edition high-quality vintage that’s been produced only four times in the winery’s 117-year history. Only 1,500 1.5-liter magnums were produced at $1,000 per bottle. Rarity 2013 is a blend of cabernet sauvignon and petit verdot from the finest vineyard blocks on Beaulieu’s famed Rutherford ranches. The Rarity Collection remains a tribute to the cabernet produced by winemaking legend Andre Tchelistcheff. Winemaker Jeffrey Stambor, who joined the Beaulieu winemaking team in 1989, has presided over the most recent vintage of Rarity to ensure it maintains its legendary quality. 

bvwines.com


Best Ice Cream: Creamistry

This unique ice cream shop uses only high-quality, all-natural, organic ingredients and a liquid nitrogen process to prepare fresh ice cream instantly. With more than 70 flavors and toppings, this rich and creamy frozen dessert can be both healthy and indulgent. Customizing your own ice cream has never been more fun!

creamistry.com


Best Brazilian Steakhouse: Chama Gaucha Brazilian Steakhouse 

You’re sure to leave content after a meal at Chama Gaucha Brazilian Steakhouse in the Galleria. Carnivores can’t get enough of the unlimited flame-roasted meats served tableside. The recent launch of the à la carte menu offers lighter fare with the same succulent flavor. On a recent visit, we couldn’t resist the shrimp ceviche and jumbo bacon-wrapped asparagus. The new menu, which allows guests to select their favorite USDA Prime cut of meat, along with two sides and a choice of homemade soup or salad, also features appetizers like a gourmet cheese platter. As soon as the summer heat subsides, be sure to check out the new covered patio—it’s perfect for al fresco dining. 

chamagaucha.com


Best Food Truck: Cousins Maine Lobster Truck

As the “#1 food truck in the nation,” Cousins Maine Lobster offers up authentic Maine seafood throughout the U.S., and since 2015, in Houston. What started out in 2012 as two cousins selling lobster rolls from a truck in L.A. has led to a nationwide brand with 20 food trucks, a brand-new restaurant and feature appearances on several TV shows, including Shark Tank.

cousinsmainelobster.com


Best Tequila: Código 1530

Privately available only in Mexico for many years, Código 1530 Tequila launched in Texas in 2016 with the help of country music legend George Strait as one of its investors. Strait had enjoyed this authentic Mexican tequila many times on his frequent visits to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, so he jumped at the chance to share it. Its moniker honors “Los Códigos,” the time-honored codes and Mexican family traditions used for generations to create this one-of-a-kind sipping tequila.

codigo1530.com


Best Celebratory Drink: Moët and Chandon

Elise Losfelt, winemaker and oenologist at Moët and Chandon, visited Houston recently to discuss the magical process of creating the world’s most famous champagne. Her visit was timed to the summer release of the brand’s new Grand Vintage Brut 2006. This is one of the Champagne region’s most prestigious and valuable collections of vintage wines dating back to 1842. The Grand Vintage Collection, among the finest of the Maison’s fine wines, celebrates winemaking excellence and savoir-faire. Surprisingly, we drank out of wine glasses, not champagne flutes; better for technical tastings.

moet.com

Getaways

Best Bed and Breakfast: La Maison

La Maison in Midtown is an urban bed and breakfast with seven elegant guestrooms featuring the luxury amenities you’d find in a five-star hotel. Each uniquely designed, well-appointed room sleeps two guests in a king or queen, but two rooms have an adjacent living room option and one is equipped with a unique king-to-twin sleeping arrangement, making La Maison a very versatile alternative to the average hotel. This European-inspired B&B could be your perfect weekend getaway in the heart of the city.

lamaisonmidtown.com


Best Adventure Golf Hole: Matakauri Lodge, Queenstown, New Zealand

Just above Lake Wakatipu in the Southern Alps of New Zealand, golf goes to the extreme! Fly in with Over the Top Helicopters, and then tee off from 4,500 feet at the world’s most picturesque golf course, and enjoy a wine-and-cheese basket to celebrate!

matakaurilodge.com


Best Tropical Bachelorette Party Location: Aruba

Planning a bachelorette trip to the island of Aruba is an exciting way to kick off the wedding festivities. Find all sorts of fun activities like snorkeling, kitesurfing and parasailing, and new twists on some others, like beach tennis and stand-up paddleboard yoga classes. When the sun sets, there are just as many nighttime events and entertainment to be found. Start the evening with a toast to the bride-to-be at super-swanky newcomer, +297 Restaurant (named for the island’s area code). You’ll feel like a Miami celebrity as you enjoy exciting flavor fusions from Europe, Asia and the Caribbean. Enjoy a bar-hopping bus tour, or hit a casino or one of the live shows to make it a truly memorable night.

aruba.com

297restaurant.com


Best Pool: Marriott Marquis Houston

Located on the rooftop of the new Marriott Marquis, the Parkview Terrace brings all the amenities of a resort experience to a downtown hotel. Kick back and relax as you float in the one-of-a-kind Texas-shaped lazy river, or enjoy the view from the rooftop infinity pool and whirlpool. Spend a peaceful day in the sun enjoying a cocktail with the warm breeze at the High Dive Bar and Grill. At the Marriott Marquis, your next getaway could be just an elevator ride away!

marriott.com


Best Weekend Getaway: South Shore Harbour Resort and Conference Center

The resort at South Shore Harbour may be just a quick 30-minute drive south of Houston, but it seems like worlds away. Relax and float for hours in the marina-side pool, and sip drinks from the swim-up bar as stately yachts glide by. Or dine and shop at Kemah Boardwalk. This weekend getaway is so close you can wait until Monday to return home.

sshr.com


Best Beach Club: Pointe West Beach Club

Since 2006, Pointe West Resort has become one of Galveston Island’s favorite vacation retreats. Pointe West is a 1,000-acre master-planned complex of condos, cottages and homes, located on the last three and a half miles of the island’s west end. The Pointe West Beach Club offers resort guests exclusive access to an infinity pool, a large hot tub and a kiddie pool for families. Rent a cabana or grill out while you unwind. Guests can also enjoy the fitness center, a game room and more than a mile of private beach.

pointewestbeachclub.com

Family

Best Children’s Story Time: Discovery Green

Located in Downtown Houston, the 12-acre park is designed as an engaging, family-friendly spot for all ages and pets. Explore and enjoy Kinder Lake, the John P. McGovern playground, refreshing water features, public art displays, dining options and more! The open lawns and amphitheater stage make for a great community space to host both private and public events. Make sure to check out the online calendar for scheduled programs all year round, including Toddler Tuesday, with interactive storytimes and activities for kids.

discoverygreen.com; bigkidsmallcity.com


Best Way to Occupy Kids on a Road Trip: Wipenote Reusable Whiteboard Notebooks

On your next road trip, develop your child’s imagination and avoid hearing “Are we there yet?” every few minutes by giving your kiddo something he or she will enjoy. Get your child curious about new destinations while nurturing a love for art with an accessory that’s great for long trips. Kids can write, draw and erase as many times as they want on this fun, reusable notebook.

wipenote.com


Best Mommy and Me Class: Conmigo Spanish Program

Conmigo is a Mommy-and-me-style Spanish language class for children and their parents or caregivers. Literally translated to “with me,” Conmigo is a fun introduction to Spanish for ages 15 months to three years, made interactive by the use of puppets, song, movement and games. Enrollment is limited to eight per class, but siblings under 15 months attend at no charge; classes are 45 minutes.

conmigospanish.net


Best Waterslide Wonderland: Typhoon Texas

Located in Katy, TX, the Typhoon Texas waterpark is a great place to bring family, friends, campers or students. Don’t miss out on featured attractions like The Gully Washer or Howdy Hollow for the little ones. If you’re up for a thrill ride, try the Monster Storm Typhoon, or just relax and float on the Lazy T River. There’s also live entertainment and a variety of eateries, including the famous Smokehouse BBQ. 

typhoontexas.com


Best Stadium for Kids: Constellation Field

Constellation Field is home to the Sugar Land Skeeters Baseball team. With five different venue options, The stadium can host any affair from sporting events and concerts to weddings, corporate events and much more. For the kids, the Memorial Hermann Play Land is a playground complete with a jungle gym, carousel and splash pad. The Astros Buddies Kids Club, baseball camp and summer reading programs are great ways for your kids to stay active all year round.

sugarlandskeeters.com


Best Fun Day for Kids: Children’s Museum of Houston

Located in the Museum District, the Children’s Museum features new activities and exhibits every day to facilitate learning with a big dose of fun! Standouts include Kidtropolis, an interactive, kid-powered, mini city designed to teach children life skills, and Invention Convention, a hands-on technology workshop where kids are encouraged to design and build their own inventions. With 12 other interactive exhibits, kids can discover a whole new world with every visit.

cmhouston.org


Best Natural Bath Products for Kids: Hip Peas

Hip Peas is a new line of natural hair and skincare products for babies’ sensitive skin. Great care has been taken to create products that are not only effective, but safe. Icing on the cake: 10 percent of all profits go to children-focused charities.

hip-peas.com

Culture & More

Best Ranch: George Ranch Historical Park

Visit an authentic Texas cattle ranch from the 1830s just 30 miles southwest of Houston in Richmond, TX. Having passed through four generations, this 20,000-acre ranch has become a living history site, showcasing the rich heritage of American pioneers. Travel back in time to explore the original “Home Place” of the George family, the 1830s Jones Stock Farm, 1860s Ryon Prairie Home and the historic 1890s Davis Victorian Mansion. The George Ranch books school, youth group and adult tours, and is even available for private events like reunions, anniversaries and weddings.

georgeranch.org


Best Theater: The Hobby Center

The Hobby Center for the Performing Arts, Houston’s premier performing arts facility, is located in Downtown Houston’s Theater District. With convenient access by the Metro Rail, catch Broadway Across America shows such as Cats, Wicked or Hamilton (coming in 2018!), or experience one of the Broadway-quality musical theater performances by Houston’s own Theater Under the Stars. The Hobby Center’s stunning grand lobby and two brilliantly designed theaters offer the ultimate theatrical viewing experience. Inside The Hobby Center you’ll also find another award-winning Andrew Cordua restaurant, Artista, offering first-class dining before or after performances.

thehobbycenter.org


Best New Arts Institution: The Moody Center for the Arts

Located on the 300-acre historic campus of Rice University, this contemporary arts center brings together arts, humanities and science innovations. The art gallery, studio, theater, classrooms and library offer visitors, students and international artists an experimental space for learning and creativity, while presenting art from all disciplines.

moody.rice.edu


Best Array of Local Artisanal Gifts: Space Montrose

Located in the heart of Montrose, this unique gift shop is home to thousands of handcrafted pieces of jewelry, art, accessories and home goods made by artists and artisans in the U.S. Several collections are only available here, so you are sure to find a one-of-a-kind gift for any occasion.

spacemontrose.com


Best Futuristic Office: DesignHive by Brookfield

DesignHive is a collaboration between four leading architectural firms to design four distinctively styled, cutting-edge, adaptive office suites. Now leasing in downtown at 1600 Smith, each suite is a new interpretation of the “next generation” work environment with an eye toward the future. This new vision of uncommon workspaces is sure to make DesignHive the brand to watch in the workplace solutions market.

designhivebybrookfield.com


Best Event Turnout: 2017 Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo

With a record 2.6 million in attendance this year, our own Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo has the world’s largest rodeo attendance to date. Each year the show is kicked off with a historic trail ride, a downtown parade and the World’s Championship Bar-B-Que Contest, followed by 21 days and nights of rodeo and concert performances. People flock to NRG Park and the Rodeo Houston fairgrounds year after year to root for their favorite cowhands, see superstar performers, go on their favorite rides, eat carnival foods, attend the livestock shows and shop until they drop. The proceeds from Rodeo Houston are devoted to educational funding to encourage and promote better livestock and agricultural practices, which also create more than 7,000 jobs locally.

rodeohouston.com


Best Church: Lakewood Church

As the largest church in the U.S., averaging about 52,000 attendees per week, Lakewood Church is committed to providing Houstonians with infinite opportunities to worship, learn and participate in the church’s inspirational work. Joel Osteen carries on his father’s work, serving as senior pastor, alongside his wife Victoria Osteen. With great worship and fellowship opportunities and consistent, positive messages, the Osteens and Lakewood Church provide more than seven services a week, including a Young Adult Worship Service and two in Spanish.

lakewoodchurch.com


Best Museum: Houston Museum of Natural Science

Dinosaurs, butterflies, planets and more! Learn about life sciences and more at the Houston Museum of Natural Science located in the Museum District. Take your family to the Burke Baker Planetarium, the Cockrell Butterfly Center or any of the 16 permanent and featured exhibitions for even more educational fun. Don’t forget to get a ticket to the Wortham Giant Screen Theatre to see amazing wildlife and stories come to life in 3D.

hmns.org


Best Wine Festival: Sugar Land Food and Wine Affair

We were transported to Italy on the opening night of the annual Sugar Land Food and Wine Affair. Bold and vigorous Italian wines were served alongside exhilarating international imports. Tasting and pairing were delicious and entertaining with master sommeliers Craig Collins and Drew Hendricks. The outdoor kitchen was no hindrance for Chef Andrew Curren as we dined al fresco in the Piazza (aka Sugar Land Town Square).

sugarlandfoodandwineaffair.com


Best Cooking Class: Main Course Cooking School

Lost in the kitchen? Or maybe you just need to refine your cooking skills? The cooking classes at Main Course Cooking School, located inside the Main Street America show home park just north of Houston in Spring, has something for everyone. Accommodating up to 24 students per class, the school offers a variety of sessions that cover everything from basic cooking skills to date-night events to explorations in international cuisine.

mccooking.com


Best Bookstore: Brazos Bookstore

Just minutes away from Rice Village, this classic bookstore has long been a hub for Houston’s most engaged readers and creative writers. From children’s books to classic literature, Brazos will not only have the right book for you, but with frequent book signings, film screenings, the Writer’s Ball and other literary events, Brazos can connect you to a whole new world of knowledge, inspiration and imagination.

brazosbookstore.com

Beauty & Fashion

Best Boutique: Backwater Boutique

Nestled in the heart of downtown Richmond, TX, the Backwater is a charming boutique partially housed in a historic red caboose. The Backwater Boutique offers chic designer collections, versatile jewelry and accessories. Unlike some shops, the Backwater carries junior’s, women’s, and plus-size clothing so anyone can create a one-of-a-kind outfit for a fabulous night out. The welcoming staff greets you by name and offers a personalized shopping experience. Don’t miss their exciting Facebook Live sales and weekly events that are sure to make each experience something memorable. Like their Facebook Page at Backwater Boutique to receive exclusive updates.

facebook.com/Backwater-Boutique


Best Eye Cream: Parry Botanicals Restorative Cream

At Parry Botanicals, the mission is to “offer products that make you feel good inside and out.” One of their top-rated products is the Restorative Cream, two ounces of highly emollient, long-lasting ointment that works on even the driest skin. Made from only natural botanicals, it’s great for all the rough spots but gentle enough for the entire body. Use as a heavy-duty restorative treatment for eczema, to minimize stretch marks, as a baby diaper ointment, or even as an ultra-moisturizing eye cream.

parrybotanicals.com


Best Makeup: Thalio Beckham Makeup Artistry

Looking for that flawless look? Thalio and his talented team of makeup artists and stylists, aka The Glam Squad, are experts at creating a stunning look for any special occasion. Using only the highest-grade products and suppliers, they offer airbrush makeup and traditional makeup, sunless tanning and hairstyling.

thaliobeckham.com


Best Facial: The Houstonian Hotel Trellis Spa

Ready for a luxurious escape? Indulge in a visit to the Trellis Spa at The Houstonian Hotel. Relax in Mediterranean-inspired surroundings and take in the 80-minute Diamond Life Infusion facial, using a Youth Elixir that provides unrivaled skin-reviving effects. This intensive treatment brings out brighter, firmer, noticeably younger-looking skin. The result is an overall rejuvenation, restoring facial contouring, improving skin texture and diminishing fine lines and wrinkles instantly. 

houstonian.com/thespa


Best Nail Salon: Akyish Japanese Retreat and Spa

Akyish is Houston’s premiere Japanese nail- art destination—and the best choice for unique trends for your tips and toes. Marbled nails, glass nails, mermaid nails, 3D custom crystals, chrome nails, you name it! Akyish accepts walk-ins, but it’s better to book ahead of time.

akyish.com


Best Vintage Boutique: Cheeky Vintage

Touted as “modern couture with a past,” Cheeky Vintage is loaded with classic fashion from high-caliber brands from a time when designer clothes stayed in style for decades. This store can turn the modern shopaholic into a vintage junkie overnight! Located off Richmond at the Shepherd intersection, you can find just the right ensemble or statement piece that will make you stand out in a crowd.

cheeky-vintage.myshopify.com


Best Spray Tan: A Tropical Haven

For that bronze goddess glow without the sun, A Tropical Haven in historic Downtown Rosenberg is the ultimate tanning and skin-care salon, offering everything you need to get that glow in no time. With a friendly staff, top-of-the-line tanning beds, California Tan spray tanning and only the best products, this salon will make you look simply luminous.

atropicalhaven.com


Best Laser Hair Removal: LaserAway

If you dream of being free from unwanted body hair but you’re scared of traditional painful treatments, fear not. LaserAway recently opened in the Houston area, bringing painless laser hair removal with them. LaserAway uses a unique process in which the laser equipment blows cold air onto the skin to minimize pain. Any time is the perfect time to get your skin smooth and beach-ready.

laseraway.com


Best Men’s Clothes Company: Balani Custom Clothiers

Balani was established in 1961 by Master Tailor Peter Balani with a mission to unwind the uptight image of custom clothing. Initially inspired by Cary Grant and Gregory Peck’s custom wardrobes, Balani epitomizes the highest level of customer experience and quality by collaborating with clients to forge a fully customized experience.

balanicustom.com

Health & Fitness

Best Therapy: MIZU Integrative Medicine Clinic and Float Center

MIZU Integrative Medicine Clinic and Float Center is the first luxury clinic in Houston to offer Floatation Therapy via three state-of-the-art floatation pods. Floatation Therapy leads to deep relaxation, and can help relieve joint and muscle pain. (It’s a favorite of JJ Watt.) Each pod, resembling a sleek, futuristic spaceship, is filled with a solution of magnesium sulfate salt and water, allowing the body to naturally float and the musculoskeletal system to decompress and stop fighting gravity.

www.mizumed.com


Best Triathlon: IronMan Texas North American Championship

The IronMan Texas North American Championship is held annually just north of Houston in The Woodlands. Consisting of a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike ride and 26.2-mile run, it’s regarded as one of the most rigorous triathlons in the world. The race starts in The Woodlands, continues through the countryside of East Texas, and returns to The Woodlands Waterway finish line. The IronMan is designed to test the limits of human capabilities and the determination to accomplish the unimaginable.

ironman.com


Best Trails: The Sandy Reed Memorial Trail (Buffalo Bayou Trail)

With 20 miles of trails from Shepherd Drive to the Turning Basin, Houstonians and visitors can run, walk and bike along the Buffalo Bayou. The new asphalt footpath is designed to accommodate both walkers and joggers for a safer journey along the waterway. Be sure to download the Buffalo Bayou Guide, and take some time to explore the beauty and history of the bayou along the way.

buffalobayou.org


Best New Park: Levy Park

This once-forgotten, recently renovated, premium park land has become a space that the people of Houston are embracing. Located in the Upper Kirby District, the park now offers a family-friendly splash pad, a putting green, an event pavilion and a dog-friendly park.

levyparkhouston.org


Best Meditation Spot: Body and Brain

Relax—this is not a gym! Body and Brain teaches holistic health and wellness with a five-step approach to activate the brain and create a deep mind-body connection. Whether you’re just searching for somewhere to relax after work that’s not a bar, or for inner healing and strength, you can find it at here.

bodynbrain.com


Best Spin Class: Ryde

Ryde is an exceptional, high-intensity and results-driven indoor-cycling experience in a cool glow-in-the-dark studio. You can “ryde” to the beat of the music while working your heart and toning your core, legs, arms and back. You even receive an email with your performance metrics after each class. What’s even more exciting, Ryde has donated more than $50,000 to a variety of incredible causes. #rydeon

letsryde.com


Best Barre Class: Trilogy Barre at Equinox

This unique barre class employs an innovative triple-barre anchoring system and resistance bands that elevate the typical ballet-inspired muscle-training techniques to a new level. Use fine-tuned resistance bands to sculpt and shape muscle tone by switching anchor points from barre to barre to challenge your entire body.

equinox.com


Best Sports Complex: O Athletik

Everyone in Houston is talking about this new super-charged sporting complex. O Atheltik combines the quality and service of several boutique fitness studios under a 35,000-square-foot roof. Every one of your workouts can be unique! Devotees can pull up the floor plan and schedules on their phones. Enjoy martial arts, swimming, boxing, sand volleyball, yoga and so much more in this massive workout facility.

oathletik.com

Editor’s Choice

Best Engagement Photo Shoot Location: Gerald D. Hines Waterwall Park

Once you see it, you will know. The Waterwall in the Uptown/Galleria District is the perfect backdrop for your engagement photos. Surrounded by 186 live oak trees, this 64-foot tall, u-shaped fountain cascades water over its towering, sculptural walls day and night. The Waterwall has been a Houston landmark for 25 years, drawing visitors, couples, ceremonies, weddings and photographers to its stunning urban beauty.

uptown-houston.com


Best New Cookbook: Houston Soups and Sips

Bayou City foodie Erin Hicks, author of the popular Houston Classic cookbook series and Houston Small Plates and Sips, gets Houstonians ready for cooler temperatures with Houston Soups and Sips, pairing the best of H Town’s soups with wine and beer. From entrée to dessert soups, Hick’s 60 recipes promise delicious results. The book also makes for a fantastic gift idea for culinary-inclined friends, family or coworkers.

erinhickscooks.com


Best Honky Tonk Venue: The Redneck Country Club

The RCC, or Redneck Country Club, is more than just a members-only dance hall; it’s a community for rednecks, honored veterans and welcoming people. Located in Stafford, The RCC attracts top live music acts and serves up some of the best homemade southern cooking around. It’s is also a great place to host your next event, or to just to relax with a drink in hand.

theredneckcountryclub.com


Best Indoor Amusement: iFly Indoor Skydiving

Afraid of jumping from an airplane? iFly can give you that true free-fall experience through a wind tunnel flight simulation. iFly has locations in Memorial and The Woodlands. Their First Time Flyers flight packages include pre-flight training, the necessary flight gear, a certified flight guide and a personalized certificate to commemorate your thrilling adventure.

iflyworld.com


Best Photo Booth: iHeart Flipbooks

iHeart flipbooks is a unique new way to capture life’s most memorable moments and cherish them forever. Their mobile studio is equipped with professional lighting, cameras, photo backdrops and fun props for your guests. These animated flipbooks are great keepsakes for your wedding or special event.

iheartflipbooks.com


Best Building: Heritage Plaza

Known as the gem of the downtown business district, the Heritage Plaza houses several offices in the heart of Downtown Houston. Inspired by Mayan architecture, the granite features at the top and the interior lobby design make for a unique, historic building. Heritage Plaza is one of the most visually distinct skyscrapers in the city’s skyline.

brookfieldproperties.com


Best Hidden Space: Buffalo Bayou Park Cistern

What was once Houston’s drinking water reservoir located underground below Buffalo Bayou Park has now been restored to a remarkable historical space featuring changing art installations. Peer into the Down Periscope, which sits atop the cistern to view 87,500 square feet of vastness, dubbed an “ancient ruin” of Houston.

buffalobayou.org


Best Brewery: 8th Wonder Brewery

Located in EaDo and named after Houston’s original eighth wonder, the Houston Astrodome, the 8th Wonder Brewery offers unique and flavorful beer selections in a fun, casual environment. From signature brews like Dome Faux’m and Hopston, to good eats from the Eatsie Boys Food truck, to the Yoga & Hops course, have a fun night out at one of the best spots in Houston.

8thwonderbrew.com


Best Online Framing: Framebridge

Need to frame those family photos to display in your home? Framebridge is an online framing service that offers custom framing delivered right to your door. After you send them your images, the Framebridge designers will work with you to choose the right size, frame and mat for your project, and then deliver the final product direct to your door free of charge. In just three easy steps, you will have a beautifully framed photo for your home or the perfect gift for your loved one.

framebridge.com

H Texas Cares: Hurricane Harvey Relief

September 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Features

As each day passes, we are more aware of how devastating Hurricane Harvey has been to the people of this great city.  Our thoughts are with you and our hopes are each and every one of you are safe, dry and coping well with this unprecedented disaster. Our mission is to connect you with organizations assisting with relief.

Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund

Houston Food Bank

United Way of Greater Houston

Houston Humane Society

Texas Diaper Bank 

L.G.B.T.Q. Disaster Relief Fund

National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster

You Caring

GlobalGiving’s Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund 

All Hands Volunteers

To the Houston Beat

February 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Features

Now 60, Robert Earl Keen still turns to his Texas roots to make memorable music—and maybe some fried venison along the way.

by Rima Jean

The name “Robert Earl Keen” is indelibly written in the minds of every Texan who came of age in the ’90s. To me, a San Antonio native, Keen’s music is synonymous with homecoming dances and riding to school in the bed of a pickup truck. It’s as homegrown as breakfast tacos and Lucchese cowboy boots. No. 2 Live Dinner came out my senior year in high school, and it was recorded live at the Floores Country Store in Helotes, just outside of San Antonio. That album, particularly “Dreadful Selfish Crime,” got lots of airtime on my rides to school…

Sometimes I can’t believe those days are gone

Most of my friends back then have moved along

One’s in Hollywood one’s a millionaire

Some are gone for good some still livin’ here

Me I’m just the same lost in a crowd

Lookin’ for the rain in a thunder cloud

I have moved around but it don’t matter though

One thing I have found there are just two ways to go

It all comes down to livin’ fast or dyin’ slow

For most teens like myself on the cusp of adulthood, Keen’s music was its lyrics—the way each song told a story that was both personal and timeless. They spoke of very basic human experiences, about leaving home, losing a girl, coming back home, finding the girl again. Today, Keen’s music has evolved, but still holds its fans rapt with each relatable message, each familiar tale.

A Houston native, some of Keen’s most enduring childhood memories are of his experiences in the city. He remembers the streets of Bellaire flooding during Hurricane Carla when he was a young boy, he remembers the excitement of going downtown to visit his parents’ offices; his mother was an attorney and the third female graduate of the University of Houston Law School. “My parents would hand me five bucks, and I’d go wandering the underground tunnels, which I knew quite well. I knew where everything was, like the original James Coney Island and all the places to find good barbecue,” Keen recalls.

As much of a city kid as Keen was, he also got a taste of the country life when he would visit his family’s home away from home between Columbus and Fayetteville, which at the time, was very rural and quaint. “I loved it. It had a totally different culture before it became what it is now,” Keen says. “These people spoke with heavy Czech and German accents. I went squirrel hunting with friends, polka dancing and all that. I was a city brat and a country kid at the same time.”

Keen spent his teen years in Sharpstown before leaving for Texas A&M University in College Station, where he began writing songs and creating his unique sound—which he describes as a “mash-up of country and folk and bluegrass”—and the rest is pretty much history. It was at Texas A&M where he met Lyle Lovett and future bandmate, Bryan Duckworth. “My music was never part of the pop culture. My world was very small. I liked playing the guitar and listening to folk music, so I was a fan of all the local [talent] like Shake Russell, Eric Taylor and Nancy Griffith. That stuff had a huge influence on me. It was music you could see and touch.”

Being able to “see and touch” the music is a must for Keen. “Setting is so important to me when I sit down and write a song, and the setting I know is Texas. If I write music about settings that I know, I don’t really have to think hard about the narrative. The message kinda floats in afterward.”

Even after being inducted into the Texas Heritage Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2012 and topping Billboard’s bluegrass charts multiple times, Keen hasn’t rested on his laurels. He recently released his album Live Dinner Reunion in late November in honor of the 20th anniversary milestone celebration of the first “live” REK album (No. 2 Live Dinner). Keen just concluded his Merry Christmas From The Fam-O-Lee 2016 Christmas Tour through Texas and parts of Oklahoma and Tennessee. Rumor even has it that Keen might be playing in Houston around the time of Super Bowl 2017…

As if that wasn’t enough, Keen supports Hill Country Youth Orchestras, the only free youth orchestra in the United States. Every year, he puts on a concert from which all the proceeds go to the organization’s Scholarship and Endowment fund. With Keen’s help, they’ve raised more than half a million dollars since the group’s inception. “It’s totally nonexclusive and completely free,” Keen proudly offers. “Any child can learn to play an instrument.”

And what does the ever-busy Keen do in his downtime? “I like to cook,” he admits. “The newest dish I’ve made up is Madras shrimp. I got into cooking Indian food this summer.” I can hear the smile in his voice. “Curry with lots of shrimp in it.” And what else does he cook? “Southern dishes,” he replies. “Fried venison and mashed potatoes. I can do that in my sleep.”

What could be better than enjoying some “Keen cuisine” (with a bottle or two of Robert Earl Keen’s Front Porch Amber Ale) while listening to Live Dinner Reunion and enjoying the company of friends and family?

Keen laughs heartily. “Not much else, I guess.” H

Anchor Away

February 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Features, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

The story of how Dave Ward made the record books (and probably toppled a tyrant)

by Lynn Ashby

Through winding streets in Tanglewood, behind a gate, are a number of townhouses, one of which belongs to Dave and Laura Ward. It’s a lovely home with a small swimming pool—Dave says it’s been years since he’s used it. On the walls of the rooms are several plaques, including the Silver Circle, an Emmy from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences – the Lone Star Chapter. And this: It was presented by the Guinness World Records, which usually bestows such honors to the tallest man, the largest cucumber and Harnaam Kaur, of Slough, Berkshire, England, whose beard is six inches long in places, making her the youngest woman with a full beard. Then there is Houston’s own Dave Ward. Why is he included? Because, as the plaque reads, he holds the world’s record of having the longest career in television news broadcasting—49 years, 218 days, from November 9, 1966 to June 2, 2016, and the meter kept running until he finally left the anchor desk at KTRK on December 9. (His contract went to the end of the year, but he had vacation time.)

Getting into Guinness isn’t easy. “It all began when Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick, who used to be a sportscaster on Channel 11, was in our station for one reason or another, and stopped by my desk and asked how long I had been at KTRK. I told him about 50 years, and Dan said, ‘Dave, nobody in this business has done that. You ought to be in the Guinness book.’ So the station contacted the company, and they wanted all kinds of verification—letters from two people who had been here when I was hired, my work records, everything. Then last June, they contacted us, and said I was in.” Now that Ward, 77, no longer needs to grind the daily grind, he and his wife plan to take a trip to California some day—he likes long-distance train trips. “My father told me when I was a little boy, ‘Dave, passenger trains are the only civilized way to travel.’” But he is not going to sit back on his sofa and play with the remote. “He’s not retiring. He’s looking forward to the next chapter in his life,” says Laura. (To follow Dave Ward after he left KTRK, “like” his Facebook page, Dave Ward’s Houston.)

More News from Dave Ward

“I was 27 years old when I made it to KTRK. Shortly after I got there, we received seven brand-new state-of-the-art black-and-white TV cameras, and I thought, Well, I guess it will be a while before we get color.” In recent years, his role at the station was diminished. He stopped doing the 10 o’clock news programs two years ago, just hosting the six o’clock news. “I just got tired of coming to work.” Since he worked evenings putting together the 10 o’clock news, “I now get to watch some evening TV. I am so fortunate Houston has been so good to me. I’ve interviewed five presidents, starting with Dwight Eisenhower. I’ve covered space shots, got to ride in a jet fighter, so much.”

He lives about 15 minutes from the station with Laura, his third wife. Ward has four children from his previous marriages. Laura has three. He used to smoke cigarettes and cigars, from the age of 14. “Then I quit until one day Marvin [Zindler] came in smoking the most wonderful-smelling cigar, and I started all over again. But I quit again.”

As for his opening lines: “I started each program with, ‘Good evening, friends,’ because Ron Stone, who I considered the best TV anchor in Houston, always began with, ‘Howdy, neighbors.’ I wanted an opening like that.”

Is TV Going to Work?

How Ward got to Houston and to Channel 13 is circuitous. David Henry Ward was born in Dallas, although his family didn’t live there. “My mother wanted to give birth in a major hospital, so she went to Dallas.” His father was a Baptist minister who moved his family around East Texas, eventually becoming minister of the First Baptist Church in Huntsville. Young Dave began his radio career with KGKB radio in Tyler while attending Tyler Junior College. Three years later, he joined the staff of WACO radio in Waco as a staff announcer. “WACO is the only radio station in America whose call letters are the city’s name,” Ward notes. A year later, he became that station’s program director.

“At that station, I was a DJ spinning Vaughn Monroe and Elvis. The station’s news director was Bob Vandiventer who taught radio news writing at Baylor University. He would bring some of his students to the station to get hands-on training, and I would see these five or six people in the news department busy, all inspired, having a great time, while I was across the glass just spinning those records, and I thought, That looks better, so I got into the news side, but I never finished college.” 

In 1962, Ward came to Houston as the first full-time news reporter on KNUZ/KQUE. “Growing up in Huntsville, it was almost like coming home.” His Houston broadcasting debut was as a night-news reporter for the radio stations. Ward’s career at KTRK began in 1966 as an on-the-street reporter/photographer.

“I was hired in a pool hall,” Ward says. “I was working at KNUZ, and a friend at Channel 13 told me there was an opening. Would I be interested? So I met with the top people at the station, General Manager Willard Walbridge, Program Manager Howard Finch and News Director Ray Conaway at Le Que, a pool hall, where they went for lunch several days a week and to shoot some pool. I was hired then and there. The station only had eight people in the newsroom back then. Today we have about 120. I took a pay cut from about $650 a week at KNUZ to $575 at KTRK. My father was not that enthusiastic about my move. He asked me, ‘This television thing, are you sure it’s going to work?’” After his stint as a street reporter, early in 1967, he began to anchor Channel 13’s weekday 7 a.m. newscast. Later that year, he became the first host of a game show, Dialing for Dollars, which later evolved into Good Morning Houston. In January 1968, Ward was promoted to co-anchor of the weekday six and 10 p.m. newscasts with Dan Ammerman.

“At the time, Ron Stone was on Channel 11, and they had 50 percent of the audience,” recalls Ward. “We were hot and we said, ‘We’re gonna kill them.’ No. We were a poor third, but we slowly climbed up in the ratings. Ammerman left, and I inherited the anchor slot solo. By ’72, we were getting there. When Jack Heard was elected sheriff in 1972, the first thing he did, on New Year’s Day, was to fire Marvin Zindler. We had the story at six. Marvin had been in the Consumer Fraud Division of the sheriff’s department, and I told our assistant news director, ‘We ought to hire that guy as a consumer fraud reporter.’ No other station in town, and maybe in the nation, had someone assigned to only that. I asked Marvin if he’d like to come here and basically do the same thing. He said, ‘Dave, there’s nothing I’d rather do.’ When Marvin came aboard, we took off.”

A Cellar’s Market

By 1973, Channel 13 was number one in this market. It held that spot through ’76, ’77 and ’78, and on through the years—a dynasty in the TV biz. During that time, Ward has co-anchored with Shara Fryer, Jan Carson and Gina Gaston. In 1974, Ward suffered a motorcycle accident at the Astrodome during a charity race. He had broken his pelvis in four places, had a concussion and much, much more. “I was in the hospital for seven weeks and received between 40,000 and 60,000 notes. I didn’t have anything else to do, so I answered them all. All of them were supportive except one, which read, ‘What, Ward? Drinking again?’”

In 2003, he was in a car wreck—crashed into an out-of-control SUV on the West Loop, and broke his right leg. Once Ward and his wife attended a wedding, got food poisoning, and Ward was out for two weeks. Then a long-simmering abdominal pain turned out to be diverticulitis. He underwent major surgery and was away for two weeks. Not that anyone should feel sorry for the anchorman. Ward makes a good living. He walks into a nearby room. “I wanted this to be a poker room. Laura wanted a wine cellar.” It’s a really nice wine cellar with 400-year-old doors from Europe, fine oaken wine racks, shaved slate walls. “I spent more on this room than I did on my first house. I once thought that it would be good to make six figures, $100,000 or more, a year. Today I pay more than that to Uncle Sam.”

Then there was the time Dave & Co. probably helped topple a banana republic dictator, Anastasio Somoza. In the 1970s, Nicaragua was hit by a deadly earthquake. Aid was pouring in, and Houston wanted to help, so KTRK organized a relief effort, recruited Houston firefighters to drive five 18-wheelers packed with food, water, blankets and other necessities. It took them months to get through all the borders and red tape, finally arriving in Nicaragua, where Dave and a cameraman met them to film a 30-minute documentary, An Odyssey of Mercy. After leaving Nicaragua for home, the group discovered that the Somoza regime had seized all the supplies and sold them in the markets. The natives found out and riots erupted. Somoza and his family fled the nation. “I always thought we helped start it.” Maybe we will see another entry in the Guinness World Records: “TV Anchor to Topple Most Dictators: Dave Ward.”

Things you should know about Dave Ward and Houston TV:

  • He reads email, but doesn’t write it.
  • After 45 years with KTRK, Ward finally got a reserved parking place. (He drives a four-year-old Mercedes.)
  • As of press time, he has not been approached by any other TV station and is not looking, although some local TV anchors and reporters have changed stations: Steve Smith and the late Ron Stone and Bob Allen.
  • Ward always wears Texas cowboy boots. He prefers Lucchese.
  • Ward and the on-camera crew always appeared in spiffy outfits, but the station did not give them extra pay for clothes, nor did it allow them to wear anything provided by a store in exchange for a plug on camera.
  • In 1960, Houston had three TV stations, each showing 45 minutes of local news on weekdays, none on weekends. Today, KTRK does between six and seven hours of local news a day.
  • Houston is the 10th largest media market in the nation.
  • Politically, he’s not. “I’m apolitical—not as liberal as my Democratic friends and not as conservative as my Republican friends.” H

Ashby watched Ward at ashby2@comcast.net.

Food Network Star, At Your Service

July 27, 2016 by  
Filed under Dining, Features

By Tom Flynn
Photography by Erin Wiese

Gordon Bethune and Laurette listen as Chef Jeff entertains the dinner guests.

Gordon Bethune and Laurette listen as Chef Jeff entertains the dinner guests.


Vegas’ bad boy of cuisine, Chef Jeff Henderson, flies into Bush Intercontinental Airport, where I await in passenger pickup. “I’m at door C-101,” he texts. “Black guy with a bald head.” Many black gentlemen with bald heads exit C-101 and wonder why I’m waving at them before one recognizes my white SUV and red shirt, and heads my way. After quick introductions, I ask, “Can you be a little more descriptive next time? Like, I’m a tall black guy with a black chef’s shirt and designer luggage.” This is the beginning of Shop, Chop, Cook and Eat, the Chef Jeff Experience.

The 6’2” Henderson has a history. His first career in sales earned him $35,000 a week, and a 19-year sentence in a federal institution. Henderson was never a user, just a seller from the Los Angeles projects. During his extended vacation from mainstream American life, Henderson did a lot of soul searching, realized he was not a victim, took responsibility for his actions and then decided to learn how to cook. Before he finished his parole, Chef Jeff had cooked his way through L.A.’s best restaurants and landed a job in Las Vegas at Caesar’s Palace, where he was voted Las Vegas’ Buffet Chef of the Year. He moved on to head chef at the prestigious Café Bellagio, the first African American to hold that position. Then he wrote a New York Times best-selling book about his life, appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show and with Steve Harvey, starred in his own Food Network TV show and became a prolific public speaker.

Now he’s riding shotgun in my SUV as we head to Central Market. This is my Christmas present from my wife, the Chef Jeff Experience. We’ll be working side by side to cook a four-course gourmet meal for six. It turns out we have a lot in common. We’re both in our 50s, have three-year olds (him, one girl; me, two identical boys), extended careers in sales (mine, legal) and public speaking, and both love cooking and our wives. Whatever earned his bad-boy reputation is long gone, and we’re looking forward to having some fun.

I love grocery stores. Between 1977 and 1984, I worked every position from sacker to store manager—it was my first career. I still study how shelves and displays are set as I walk the Montrose area H-E-B and Disco Kroger. Part of the Chef Jeff Experience is learning to navigate a store and select the best ingredients. Ten minutes into our trip, he confesses a little frustration; I know this Central Market better than he does. “No worries, Chef. I know the store in your neighborhood better than you do, and I’ve never been there,” I reply. But the big guy has a presence, and a lot of heads turn as my famous new friend selects fresh fruits and veggies, along with jumbo lump crab meat, sea bass and a rack of lamb.

He is a little distant on the ride from the store to the house, and I realize he’s thinking of the magnitude of his task. He’s walking into a kitchen he has never seen, with a guy he just met, to produce a meaningful culinary experience for six people who are showing up in a few hours with high expectations. Wow! He has little clues of the appliances, utensils or pantry goods available. I ask him why he stresses himself out like this. “I left the Café Bellagio 28 days after appearing on Oprah and became a public speaker. This project keeps me in the kitchen and keeps me cooking,” he says.

And he’s in luck. We have a large, gorgeous kitchen with every gadget and pantry item a chef could need. He becomes the general of our two-man army, requesting stations for each dish on the menu and setting up a restaurant-style assembly line in my home kitchen. My first prep task is cutting corn off the cobs. “What’s next, Chef?” “You’ve got to do every ear,” he replies. “I did.” It goes the same way with the potatoes. He looks at my work, and lets out a chuckle and a little sigh of relief. “I didn’t know you had good hands. We’ve got plenty of time.”

Chef Jeff’s photographer shows up before mine (again, we have a lot in common) and starts documenting our progress. They sneak out to the store and come back with flowers; I get a vase. “We don’t need a vase, these are for us. We’re going to add some class to these pictures,” says Chef. We break the flowers down and put a little Mason jar filled with tulips at each workstation. I’m in the middle of chopping sausage for our crab chowder, when Chef asks me to join him at the stove. “You ready, Bobby?” he asks his photographer, now turned videographer. Without warning, Chef puts his arm around my shoulders and turns from being a contemplative chef into the Food Network star. “Hey, all right y’all, Chef Jeff here with my friend Tom in his mac daddy kitchen in Houston, Texas, cooking up some amazing…” Next thing I know, I’m being interviewed about travels and culinary experiences in front of a live camera!

The chef and Food Network star becomes host, server and entertainer as our guests arrive and sit for dinner, sharing his life lessons between courses. The food is phenomenal, the experience one of a kind. And it never really ends.

You can learn more about Shop, Chop, Cook and Eat, the Chef Jeff Experience by visiting www.chefjefflive.com. But for now, check out the recipes here.

Screen Shot 2016-07-26 at 2.57.09 PM


STARTER: Watermelon Cube with Minted Citrus Salad
(Serves 6)

WatermelonCube1 cup water
1 cup white sugar
12 mint leaves
½ kiwi, peeled and diced
½ peach, peeled and diced
½ Meyer lemon, peeled and segmented
8 strawberries, cored and diced
½ cup fig-infused balsamic vinegar
6–8 (1-inch) cubes chilled seedless watermelon

1. Make a simple syrup: Combine the water and sugar in a small pot and bring to a simmer while stirring, until the sugar dissolves, about 8–10 minutes. Poor the syrup into an 8-ounce jar and let cool; reserve the remaining syrup for the dessert.
2. Roughly chop the mint leaves, wrap in cheesecloth and tie with butcher’s twine. Add the mint bundle to the syrup, secure with a lid and refrigerate overnight.
3. Add the diced kiwi, peaches, lemon and strawberries to a small bowl and let stand so the flavors blend.
4. Add the vinegar to a 10-inch sauté pan over low-medium and reduce by half or until the desired thickness is achieved. Remove from the heat and let cool.
5. Cut small cavities in the watermelon cubes, about ¼-inch deep, using a sharp knife or small melon-ball scoop. Add a little dollop of the fruit mixture atop each watermelon cube. Drizzle with ½ teaspoon minted simple syrup.

Plate it Perfectly: Dip a small pastry brush into the reduced balsamic and paint a stripe on each plate. Place a watermelon cube in the center of each stripe. Top with a sliver or 2 of julienned mint leaves.


Appetizer: Louisiana Lump Crab–Sausage Chowder
(Serves 6–8)

1 stick unsalted butter, plus 2 tablespoons, divided
1 pound smoked turkey or hot pork sausage, cut into ¼-inch cubes
½ cup all-purpose flour
½ yellow onion, diced
3 celery ribs, diced
½ green bell pepper, diced
½ jalapeño, seeded and minced
3 tablespoons minced garlic
Salt and black pepper to taste
¼ cup Riesling wine
2 (8-ounce) bottles clam juice
2 (32-ounce) containers low-sodium chicken stock
2 bay leaves
1½ cups heavy whipping cream
1 pound jumbo lump crabmeat, cleaned
Cajun seasoning to taste
½ cup oyster crackers for garnish
1 tablespoon finely chopped chives for garnish
Crab-chowder2 tablespoons grated Manchego or Parmesan cheese for garnish

1. Melt 1 stick butter in a stockpot over medium. Add the sausage and continue stirring until caramelized. Add the flour and stir constantly until the flour begins to turn brown. Add the vegetables and garlic, cooking until softened. Season with a nice pinch of salt and pepper.
2. Slowly stream in the wine, clam juice and chicken stock and add the bay leaves, stirring constantly to dissolve the flour mixture. Bring to boil, then reduce the heat and simmer uncovered for 35–45 minutes, or until slightly thickened.
3. Add the heavy whipping cream and simmer for 12–15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.
4. Meanwhile, brown the remaining butter in a sauté pan over medium. Gently fold in the crabmeat and sauté until warm. Add Cajun seasoning to taste.

Plate it Perfectly:
Ladle the soup into bowls, garnish with oyster crackers and chives; top with big lumps of crap and freshly grated cheese.


Main Course: Herb-Encrusted Rack of Lamb
(Serves 4–6)

1 (6-bone) rack of lamb, trimmed and Frenched
Kosher salt and black pepper for rubbing
Cajun Seasoning for rubbing
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup Italian breadcrumbs
1 tablespoon freshly minced rosemary
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 cloves garlic, minced
rack-lamb
1. Liberally season the lamb with salt, pepper and Cajun seasoning.
2. Heat the olive oil in large cast-iron skillet over medium-high and sear the lamb until all sides are golden. Remove from the heat and set aside for 1 hour.
3. Preheat the oven to 375°F.
4. Combine the breadcrumbs and rosemary in a small bowl and set aside.
5. Rub the fat cap of the lamb with the mustard and garlic, then pack with the breadcrumb mixture.
6. Bake until the internal temperature reaches 118°F–120°F, slightly past medium-rare. Let rest for 15 minutes and cut into individual chops.


Main Course: Barbecue Chip–Encrusted Chilean Sea Bass
(Serves 6)

1 (3-pound) Chilean sea bass fillet
3 tablespoons olive oil, plus more as needed
Kosher salt and black pepper to taste
8 ounces barbecue kettle chips
2–3 tablespoons olive oil

SeaBass1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Cut the fillet into 6 pieces and remove the skin and lingering bones.
2. Heat the oil in a cast-iron skillet over medium-high. Working in batches, sear the fillets, until the bottom sides are brown and crispy. Meanwhile, season the top sides with salt and pepper.
3. Remove from the heat and let rest on a paper towel–lined plate, crispy side up.
4. Place the chips in a food processor and grind to a breadcrumb texture. Using a pastry brush, paint the seared sides of the fillets with olive oil and top with the chip crumbs.
5. Transfer the fillets to a baking pan and bake for 12–15 minutes, or until desired doneness. Remove from the oven and set aside.

Pair it Perfectly:
Cote du Rhone Blanc


Main Course: Corn and Bacon Maque Choux
(Serves 6–8)

choux½ pound thick-cut smoked bacon, diced
10 fingerling potatoes, quartered
1 large carrot, peeled and small diced
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more if needed
1½ tablespoons freshly minced garlic
½ yellow onion, diced
3 celery ribs, diced
½ green bell pepper, diced
½ yellow bell pepper, diced
1 jalapeño, seeded and diced
6 baby portabella mushrooms, stemmed and quartered
5 ears corn on the cob, kernels removed
1 bunch Swiss chard or collard greens, cut into 1-inch pieces
¼ cup chicken stock
Salt and black pepper to taste
Parsley sprigs for garnish

1. In large sauté pan, cook the bacon over medium-high until caramelized. Add the potatoes and carrots and cook until they begin to brown.
2. Add the butter, garlic and remaining vegetables and cook for 8–10 minutes, stirring often until desired doneness is achieved. Add the chicken stock. Season with salt and pepper.

Plate it Perfectly: Neatly place 1⁄3 cup maque choux in the center of each plate. Top with sea bass, then prop the lamb chop against the fish, bone pointing up. Garnish with parsley sprigs.


Dessert: Citrus Berry Parfait
(Serves 6–8)
parfait
½ quart heavy whipping cream
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 pint strawberries, hulled and diced
½ pint blueberries
1 orange, zested
¾ cup simple syrup (see watermelon starter recipe)
¼ Angel food cake, medium diced
8 ounces candied pecans or walnuts, roughly chopped
Mint leaves for garnish

1. Place a glass or stainless-steel bowl and the carton of whipping cream in the freezer for 30 minutes.
2. Pour the cream into the chilled bowl and add the honey, sugar and cinnamon. Whip with a wire whisk, until soft peaks form.
3. Combine the fruit and zest in a medium bowl and add the simple syrup; toss gently.

Plate it Perfectly: Make parfaits by layering the fruit mixture, angel food cake, chopped nuts and whipped cream in 8-ounce mason jars. Top with whipped cream and mint leaves. Serve with long spoons.

An Act of Faith

March 23, 2016 by  
Filed under Blogs, Community, Features

by Matt Bartlett

West End Baptist Church has experienced better days. Founded in 1906, the church dwindled from 2,000 members in the ’60s to just 18 in the summer of 2015. The windows of the sanctuary were boarded and the upkeep of the buildings located at 802 Shepherd Drive was too much for the congregation to handle. After pressure from the city to make repairs and an offer from a third party to buy the land, the church’s future was uncertain. Then the congregation decided to do something truly remarkable: Rather than sell, the members voted unanimously on August 28, 2015 to donate the land and buildings, valued at 10 million dollars, to River Pointe Church of Richmond, Texas.

Renovations on the West End Baptist Church building are well underway.

Renovations on the West End Baptist Church building are well underway.

Led by Pastor Patrick Kelley, RPC was born 19 years ago inside a residential home in Richmond. Growing quickly, the church soon met at a local clubhouse, then two different high school auditoriums, before settling in to a 96-acre campus. RPC launched a Missouri City campus in 2012 and more recently, a West Houston campus at the beginning of 2015. Named the 25th-fastest-growing church in the United States by Outreach Magazine, more than 1,500 members attend weekly services in Richmond, Missouri City and West Houston.

By the summer, the West Houston campus had grown so quickly that church staff began considering a permanent building rather than continuing to rent the Moran Fine Arts Center for services. It was then that Pastor Kelley noticed the nearby West End Baptist Church and reached out to WEBC’s part-time pastor Michael Quintanilla. Through their discussions, the idea of a merger grew into a reality. Ultimately for the members of WEBC, the decision to join forces came down to their desire to “honor the legacy of their grandparents and great grandparents who, in 1954, sacrificed a great deal to build that building. They wanted to see it continue as a church,” recalls Pastor Kelley. In an effort to preserve that legacy, the campus adopted the name West End Church.

Construction is set to begin in the spring, with a grand opening tentatively scheduled for December 2016. Renovations will include a neighborhood coffee shop, a prayer garden, a children’s building and an extensive remodeling of the sanctuary, complete with new air conditioning, electricity and plumbing. During the renovations, the church will return to the Moran Fine Arts Center. For now, they are holding “pre-renovation” services inside the sanctuary.

When asked about what the new church would be like, Pastor Kelley described the merger as a “partnership” in which “the best of both congregations [would combine] to create a really effective ministry.” The people of WEBC have a long history of caring for the community in the heart of West Houston. River Pointe brings an effective ministry model, some great musicians and a large congregation excited about joining in with the good work already underway. Pastor Kelley calls the newly formed church a safe place to “process your doubts [without] feeling any pressure.” Come see for yourself.

Weight-Loss Tips Worth Making All Year Long!

March 22, 2016 by  
Filed under Blogs, Features, Health & Wellness

by A.J. Henley

The weather’s getting warmer, and beach season feels like it’s just around the corner. It’s that time of year again…when you pledge to overhaul your diet for the sake of your waistline and your well-being. You’re a paragon of virtue to start, but just a few weeks (or even days) in, your motivation begins to flag. Feeling “hangry”—hungry and angry about all that deprivation—you scarf down two pieces of sheet cake at an office birthday party, and then scrap your evening salad for Mexican takeout and a heaping bowl of ice cream.

HTX_diet

Before you blame a lack of willpower (or those cake-loving co-workers!) for your poor follow-through, look at your goals with a critical eye. Ask yourself if they can really be accomplished within the time frame you’ve allotted and what you’ll do specifically to support them on a daily basis. “Without an attainable, detailed action plan in place, you won’t make it to the finish line,” says nutritionist Lisa Jubilee, MS, CDN, a cofounder of Living Proof Nutrition Strength Pilates in New York. “It’s also important that the strategic steps be things that you’re willing and able to work into your schedule.” If you spend long hours on the job, for example, telling yourself you’ll cook every night will only set you up for failure. “It’s more effective to be consistent,” she says, opting for modest vows you can live with (say, two home-cooked meals a week) rather than lofty ones you can’t.

To inject momentum into your best intentions, Jubilee and other experts came up with 11 very doable goals. Adopt a few to start, adding more as the first ones stick. By staying flexible and being patient, these good-for-you behaviors will soon become second-nature, helping you make those weight-loss ambitions a reality.

1. Picture a slimmer, stronger you.
“Like any work project, you should have an idea of what the end result will be” before you begin, says Katherine Tallmadge, MS, RD, the author of Diet Simple: Lose Weight & Get Healthy Without Dieting (LifeLine Press, 2011). She suggests visualizing your life when you’re at your ideal weight at least once a day, be it walking into a party looking fabulous, or clad in workout wear, killing that spin class. The ritual will help boost your confidence, she says, which is a proven prerequisite for success.

2. Commit to three squares.
Consuming small, frequent meals might seem like a no-brainer for keeping hunger and energy dips at bay, but it’s not necessarily the best way to slim down. “It depends on your personality and schedule, but I find mini meals make people more obsessed with food,” Tallmadge says.

There’s a physiological downside to grazing as well: “When you continually eat throughout the day, your body has no reason to tap into fat reserves for fuel,” Jubilee explains. “For most people, consuming moderately sized, nutrient-rich meals less frequently will give the body a greater chance of reaching glycogen depletion and enable fat loss to occur.”

3. Eat more consciously. Multitasking—say, munching while watching TV, reading or texting—can be a recipe for overindulging. Instead, sit down to eat. Clear your desk of distractions and make your dinner table a tech-free zone so you can focus solely on your meal. “Chewing each bite of food until it’s almost liquefied forces you to slow down and allows the body to absorb more nutrients,” says Joel Fuhrman, MD, author of The End of Dieting: How to Live for Life (HarperOne, 2014). “It takes about 20 minutes for your brain to receive signals from digestive hormones that you’re full.”

4. Allow yourself a daily treat. Nothing not to like here! If chocolate, a bag of chips or a glass of wine is calling your name, go for it—within reason, of course. “Banning foods is not sustainable,” says Susan Moores, MS, RD, a nutrition consultant in St. Paul, MN. “A ‘forbidden fruit’ becomes a bigger draw and a point of focus.”

“A healthy diet is about balance, not extremes,” adds Jubilee. “That’s why I tell my clients to first feed their body what it needs, and save a little room for what it purely wants.” Many successful weight losers and maintainers follow the 80/20 rule, making sure 80 percent of their calories consumed are healthy and saving the remaining 20 percent for an indulgence. Others simply factor a portion-controlled 100- to 150-calorie snack into their daily calorie tally. But be sure to make that treat count; for a sweet or salty snack to truly satisfy, it should be something you’re craving, whether that’s a cup of fruit-flavored Greek yogurt or a few squares of dark chocolate. And if you’re tempted to go back for seconds? Keep in mind that you’ll have another chance to partake tomorrow—and every day after that.

5. Keep tabs. Writing down everything you put in your mouth may be annoying and feel like a lot of work, which is why many people don’t do it. But journaling can up your chances of following through with the changes you need to make, Tallmadge says. In addition to keeping you accountable, jotting down what you eat, as well as your motivation for losing weight and the feelings surrounding every meal and milestone, is a process that’s vital to staying confident and strong.

But don’t shy from documenting the little slips along the way as well. “Negative reinforcement is sometimes just as important as positive reinforcement,” she says. If you’re reading about the stomachache you had after a junk-food binge, you may think twice about polishing off a box of doughnuts or a big plate of fries.

6. Institute Fish Fridays. “Like the concept of Meatless Mondays, this is a clever way to include seafood on your menu,” says Moores. Ounce for ounce, fish contains fewer calories than beef and even poultry, and provides an important dose of omega-3 fatty acids—nutrients linked to a healthier heart and brain. “Still, it’s not a blanket pass,” she cautions. “It hinges on the way the fish is prepared, what it’s eaten with and many other elements.”

There’s one other catch, too: You can easily cancel out the benefits with seafood that’s contaminated with mercury, antibiotics or harmful chemicals like PCBs. To play it safe, look for sardines, mackerel, wild Alaskan salmon, pole-caught albacore tuna and Arctic char. For additional options, check out the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s “Super Green” list at www.seafoodwatch.org; you can find the best picks for your state or download its free app to your smartphone.

Lasting Impression: The Scholibo and Henry Brashear Buildings (circa 1880, 1882)

March 22, 2016 by  
Filed under Features

Post-Reconstruction remnants.

The Scholibo Building and the Henry Brashear Building

The Scholibo Building and the Henry Brashear Building

In 1880, when former president Ulysses S. Grant visited Houston by rail to celebrate the opening of Union Station, our city’s population was but some 16,000 people—slightly smaller than that of Galveston. In the ensuing decade, however, the growth of the railroads, combined with our state’s cotton- and lumber-based economy, would help the Houston economy to thrive.

Two neighboring landmark buildings from our post-Reconstruction boom still survive today, on the 900 block of Prairie Street: the two-story Scholibo Building (1880) and thew three-story Charles Brashear Building (1882). The former, at 912 Prairie, is named for the family of German-born baker Charles Scholibo (1844–1900). Over the course of the 20th century, the structure, marked by its Italianate architecture, would be home to many businesses. Restored and renovated in the 1990s, it now houses the Fryar Law Firm.

Banker Charles Brashear (1839–1911), born a Houstonian in the era of the Republic of Texas, was the scion of a locally prominent family; one cousin, Sam Houston Brashear, served as mayor of Houston in the late 1890s. The Victorian building at 910 Prairie that bears his name was designed by noted architect Eugene Heiner (1852–1901). Heiner’s other work includes Houston’s old Cotton Exchange Building (1884), at 202 Travis, and a number of courthouses throughout the state of Texas.


Read more in the 2016 Spring H Texas issue, available soon on newsstands and digitally.

Lasting Impression: Blaffer Art Museum

September 1, 2015 by  
Filed under Features

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Founded circa 1971–1973 (formerly Sarah Campbell Blaffer Gallery)

by Clifford Crouch • photos by Nicholas Nguyen

blafferBlaffer Art Museum, located on the University of Houston campus (near the intersection of Cullen and Elgin), is but the most visible and outward sign of the ways in which the Blaffer family has graced Houston and the art world.

That grace proceeds in particular from philanthropist Sarah Campbell Blaffer (1885–1975), born 130 years ago on August 27. More broadly speaking, it proceeds from the anointing of Texas oil wealth. As the daughter of William T. Campbell (a founder of Texaco) and the wife of Robert E. Lee Blaffer (a founder of Humble Oil, now ExxonMobil), the Texas-born Sarah might almost be viewed as corporate petroleum merger made; but her interest was less in oil drilling than in oil painting. After her wedding—Ima Hogg was maid of honor—Sarah spent a long European honeymoon that included touring the continent’s art museums. She subsequently became a collector of fine art, and then a patron and benefactor, finally establishing the Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation in 1964. Her son John H. Blaffer also contributed the massive Robert Lee Blaffer Wing (completed in 1953) to Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts in memory of his father. The Blaffer Foundation’s extensive collection continues to make works of the old European masters accessible to Texans. H

Houston’s Top 8 Doggie Destinations

September 1, 2015 by  
Filed under Features

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Get your best friend out of the (dog) house! Read on for our city’s hottest spots for well, Spot.

by Ian Kretz

Just because summer’s coming to an end, doesn’t mean you should stop making the outdoors your playground. And for all of us doggie lovers, no family outing is complete without our pups by our sides. Fortunately, digging up exciting and enjoyable experiences we can share with our dogs right here at home is, sometimes literally, a walk in the park. Here are some of our favorite, distinctly Houstonian destinations where your whole family can have a ball together this season.


Doggie_BarnabysWhy it’s a doggie do: The Barnaby’s Café franchise offers Houston’s best-loved doggie dining experience by far. What began in Montrose as a comfortable neighborhood café and tribute to the owner’s departed childhood best friend, Barnaby the Sheepdog, has expanded into eight locations spread among some of Houston’s most recognizable neighborhoods, from The Heights and Memorial to Midtown and Downtown. Each location is dog friendly, though some are friendlier than others; the River Oaks location, in particular, has the same quirky menu as the others but the most spacious patio area, where Fido foodies are invited to sit with their families and enjoy a relaxed evening.

H Texas recommends: Barnaby’s French Dip sandwich, served on fresh bread with natural au jus, makes for a decadent diner classic, and every salad on the menu is fresh, surprising and generous (smaller sizes are available, too). Kids will love the burgers, hot dogs and warm brownies served à la mode. Dog biscuits and water will make your pooch’s evening extra special.

For more information: www.barnabyscafe.com


Doggie_StDanesWhy it’s a doggie do: Saint Dane’s is a fantastic bar to take your children to…as long as your children walk on four legs and prefer barking to talking. One of the few Midtown bars that welcome fur babies, Saint Dane’s prides itself on having “plasmas everywhere you look,” making any spot ideal for watching the big game. Wood-framed, raised tables and plenty of neon lend the bar a dive-y quality that belies a well-stocked bar with daily drink specials and a draft beer selection that will impress. Dogs will love lounging on the covered porch or on the street front before a spectacular view of Downtown; all the game day excitement is sure to keep them entertained.

H Texas recommends: The “Wes” Burger, served with a fried egg on top, is one of Houston’s great bar burgers (available at lunchtime as a special), and the Sweet Chili Lime buffalo wings are crispy to a fault and offer a flavor (and how) off the beaten bar fare path. Live music (most Saturday nights) includes a selection of classic rock favorites; bands usually take requests, so be sure to ask for “Hound Dog.”

For more information: www.saintdanes.com


Doggie_BlackLabWhy it’s a doggie do: Even dogs appreciate the finer things in life, and despite its name and buttoned-up British air, all breeds are welcome to enjoy a dining experience worth begging for at The Black Labrador. Since 1986, this English-style pub, a favorite of Houstonians, has served a mix of authentic British cuisine and more familiar fare in a meticulously recreated English-pub atmosphere. The interior is warm and bright, with characteristically low ceilings and wood paneling aplenty, while the outdoor seating area (complete with cobblestones) is airy, comfortable and shaded by a canopy of trees—perfect for an after-lunch dog nap. All in all, The Black Labrador offers a quiet, distinctly British environment to enjoy delicious food with English Mastiffs, Scottish Terriers and everything in between.

H Texas recommends: The mussels on the appetizer menu are a bountiful yet light entrée to any of the traditional English menu items, including piping hot, flaky Beef Wellington and classic English-style Fish & Chips. The Black Labrador Pub exceeds the promise of its name, offering an exhaustive roster of delicious beers that pair well with any dish. Sunday brunch begins at 11 a.m., and the Bangers & Mash hounds of Houston tend to come running-—be sure to get there early for a cozy table outside.

For more information: www.blacklabradorpub.com


Doggie_GoodDogWhy it’s a doggie do: Reward your dog with a trip to Good Dog Houston, where local ingredients and that American standard, the hot dog, are celebrated par excellence. The restaurant gained its pack of loyal followers during its incarnation as a favorite food truck before setting up a permanent shop in The Heights. You’ll find a curated menu of one-of-a-kind franks (including tofu dogs), handcrafted toppings, classic sides and an ever-changing selection of locally sourced beers on tap. Good dogs and humans alike will find plenty of space on the comfortable outdoor deck to enjoy these highbrow hot dogs.

H Texas recommends: The Texican Dog is a spicy, South-of-the-Border dream that combines refried black beans, Oaxaca cheese, avocado, pickled jalapeños and fresh vegetables atop a perfectly cooked frank. The Fried Corny Dog, served with signature sriracha ketchup, is the be-all, end-all ideal corndog. The average price of one of these masterpieces is about $7, so don’t forget to order something for Rover.

For more information: www.gooddoghouston.com


Doggie_BillArcherParkWhy it’s a doggie do: Think of Bill Archer Bark Park as Houston’s doggie Disneyworld. Located north of I-10, about halfway between Houston and Katy, the park features more than 20 acres of off-leash play space for your pup. These expansive, beautiful grounds alone make the park well worth the trip (about a 30-minute drive from Downtown), and attractions like canine agility equipment for large and small breeds and swimming ponds seal the deal. Extensive, manicured walking trails and shaded benches provide relaxing options for owners and those dogs deemed people persons.

H Texas recommends: The park is open from 7 a.m. until dusk, so peak hours tend to coincide with evening free time during the workweek, while weekend days are busy throughout. Depending on your dog’s temperament around other dogs, you may want to plan your trip accordingly. Note: All the usual dog park rules apply, including no outside food or drink (for either you or your pet), so be sure you both have a snack before your outdoor romp. Water fountains for two- and four-legged friends are available inside the park.

For more information: www.visithoustontexas.com


Doggie_GeneGreenParkWhy it’s a doggie do: This dog park gives adventurous pups a chance to walk or run on the wild side. Gene Green Beltway 8 Dog Park, located about 20 minutes from Downtown, on the northeast side, boasts, in addition to spacious grounds, off-leash play areas and other standard dog park attractions, several areas of natural Texas brush and flora that offer all dogs, particularly sporting breeds, an opportunity to use their instincts and get in touch with their wolfish ancestors. For those dogs that don’t know they are of the canine species, manicured green space enjoyed from one of many shaded benches offers all of nature’s best aspects.

H Texas recommends: The equally top-flight splash park, skate park and children’s playground at Gene Green Beltway 8 Park will be difficult for younger kids to resist for any length of time; be sure to bring swimwear, skateboards and another adult to supervise the kids in their own adventures without taking any time out of Rover’s. Don’t forget the camera!

For more information: www.hcp1.net/Parks/GeneGreen.aspx


Doggie_HotelDerekWhy it’s a doggie do: Hotel Derek is arguably Houston’s most lavish and popular boutique destination hotel. Located a stone’s throw from The Galleria in Uptown, Hotel Derek is a beacon of contemporary glamour in our city. Elegant, comfortable rooms and refined dining, spas and amenities are perfect for Houstonians looking for a luxurious staycation or travelers who prefer to do so in style. Best of all, Hotel Derek is dog friendly, with several unique amenities geared specifically toward pups. Pets do stay for an additional fee, a large portion of which is donated to the Houston SPCA. Your pooch will thank you for, and quickly become used to, a seat in the lap of luxury over a splendid stay at Hotel Derek.

H Texas recommends: Dog-friendly rooms are all on the “dedicated pet floor” with convenient outdoor access for making such trips fast and easy. However, space is limited, so be sure to book your room well in advance. For pampered pooches, the recently unveiled Wag Lounge is an unforgettable relaxation destination located just down the hall from your suite. Beyond the hotel, Memorial Park, just five minutes away, offers exciting possibilities for doggie daytrips.

For more information: www.hotelderek.com/about/pet-friendly-hotels-houston


Doggie_DiscoveryGreenWhy it’s a doggie do: Discovery Green in Downtown Houston is a vibrant, verdant oasis hidden among the buildings and bustle of our city’s center. With athletic fields and walking trails, jungle gyms and paddleboats, and of course, plenty of greenery, Discovery Green has something for everyone, including dogs. Pups are sure to enjoy the more literal jungle within the urban one; the shaded off-leash dog runs (one for large dogs, one for small) offer a chance to play in a new environment filled with fascinating sights and sounds. And when your pup is all done, feel free to leash him up and take him on a tour of the larger Discovery Green area for an even more vivid day of adventure.

H Texas recommends: From outdoor art installations and film to ice skating and free yoga and Pilates classes, something fun is always going on at Discovery Green. Try to time your dog park trip to take advantage of interesting and usually free community activities. A full events calendar is available on the Discovery Green website.

For more information: www.discoverygreen.com/the-dog-runs H

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